Going down to the most basic element in this idea is

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exist, then the colors have to exist. Going down to the most basic element in this idea is the way to find truth. If the mind can think up these colors, a posteriori of color is important and exists just as much as the “I” does. If a posteriori of color is true and determined to exist, what other elements in the world that one experiences can be undeniably true? Still, is anything true at all, or is it all just deception by a God who has power over one’s mind. Descartes explores this deeper and discusses the implications of a God that has the ability to create one’s existence. “How do I know that he has not brought it about that there is no earth, no sky, no extended thing, no shape, no size, no place,
Barnett 6 while at the same time ensuring that all these things appear to me to exist just as they do now,” This is a strong argument that Descartes puts in front of the reader. As seen before, Descartes believes in two certainties, the existence of the “I” (I think, therefore I am) and the existence of a God, so why is he casting doubt upon one of his truths that are beyond all doubt? He does this because he wants to prove that God cannot be doubted. Later in his Meditations, he goes on to explain that a God that is good, and he believes that God is undoubtedly good, would not deceive his creations. Deception is evil, and goes against all things good, so deceiving would place doubt onto God’s existence. Because God certainly exists, and he does not deceive, then the shapes must exist. Size must exist. Place must exist. This all must exist if God is in the foundation of Descartes building. E. Analysis of Secondary Passages “Is there not a God, or whatever I may call him, who puts into me the thoughts I am now having? But why do I think this, since I myself may perhaps be the author of these thoughts? In that case am not I, at least, something? But I have just said that I have no senses and no body. This is the sticking point: what follows from this? Am I not so bound up with a body and with senses that I cannot exist without them? But I have convinced myself that there is absolutely nothing in the world, no sky, no earth, no minds, no bodies. Does it now follow that I too do not exist? No: If I convinced myself of something then I certainly existed. But there is a deceiver of supreme power and cunning who is deliberately and constantly deceiving me. In that case I too undoubtedly exist, if he is deceiving me; and let him deceive me as much as he can, he will never bring it about that I am nothing so long as I think that I am something. So after considering
Barnett 7 everything very thoroughly, I must finally conclude that this proposition, I am, I exist, is necessarily true whenever it is put forward by me or conceived in my mind.” (387) In this passage, Descartes provides stronger evidence that the “I” exists. He claims that even if God is deceitful, he must have something to deceit. The fact that God may be writing the script to the thoughts in one’s mind, only gives further solid evidence that there is for certain a mind to put thoughts into. Without anything around, no sky, no earth, no body, one thing cannot

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