This computer based test includes questions that may

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This computer-based test includes questions that may be multiple-choice, fill-in-the-blank, choose from a drop-down menu, or drag-and-drop the response from one place to another. The purpose of the GED test is to provide students with the skills necessary to either further their education or be re ady for the demands of today’s careers. Lesson 13 Warm-up: Solve the carpet question Time: 10 Minutes Write on the board: Ronda wants to buy carpet for her bedroom. She measures the length at 10 feet and the width at 8 feet 6 inches. The carpet is sold in 12-foot-wide rolls. Basic Question: What is the area of the bedroom? o If students convert inches to decimals and just convert 6 inches to 0.6, ask them why this doesn’t work. Because it’s 6/12, not 6/10, so they have to do e quivalent fractions first. Answer: 10 x 8.5 = 85 square feet. Extension Questions: How many square feet should she buy knowing she’ll have to cut some off one side? o Draw a picture on the board if needed for explanation of where the extra is. She will buy12 x 8.5 = 102 square feet She can buy a clearance carpet at $0.89/square foot or she can buy carpet that’s regularly sold at $1.29 a square foot but is now 20% off. Which is a better deal? o Students may figure out the whole 102 square feet price for each. See if anyone figures out the price for just one square foot, which will give us the information we need. $1.29 x 0.8 = $1.03, so the clearance carpet is cheaper. Lesson 13 Activity 1: Vocabulary Time: 5 Minutes This activity (below) can be projected on the board and done as a whole class. Have students volunteer to write answers. ( Answers: 1d, 2a, 3b, 4f, 5c and 6e)
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Lesson 13: Mean, Median, Mode, and Range D. Legault, Minnesota Literacy Council, 2014 3 Mathematical Reasoning Lesson 13 Activity 2: M,M,M, and Range Computation Time: 20-25 Minutes 1) Example A: Ask five students how many children they have, and write all the numbers on the board. Now you can figure out together: Mean: Take all the numbers, add together, and divide by 5, the number of students surveyed. That gives you the average. Mode: Are there two students who have the same number of children (could be zero)? If yes, that’s the mode. If not, there is no mode. Median: Put all five numbers in a row from lowest to greatest. The one in the middle is the median. Range: Take the difference of the greatest minus the lowest and that is the range. 2) Example B: Now ask another student so you have six total. Figure out the mean, the mode (if there is one), and the range. What is the median? It’s halfway between the two middle numbers. (If those are 2 and 3, the median in 2.5, for example) 3) Give students Handout 13.1 for more examples. 4) Do Worksheet 13.2 for practice. Do the first one together. An alternative to the worksheet is to have groups of 3-4 students use a deck of cards. Together they pick 4-5 cards and compute the M,M,M and range. Every group would have different answers so the teacher would need to circulate to check.
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