F4312 posttraumatic stress disorder the criterion a

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F43.12 Posttraumatic stress disorder The Criterion A event for PTSD diagnosis is defined as a person who has experienced, witnessed, or was confronted with an event that involved actual or threatened death or serious injury, or a threat to the physical integrity of self or others (Wheeler, 2014). Rates of PTSD are higher among veterans, with some of the highest rates being found among those who were in military combat (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). This client reports that she has experienced two traumatic events since 2012. While in Afghanistan 4 members of her battalion were killed by an IED, and several months later she lost her son when he was 10 days old. According to the DSM-5, the traumatic event can be reexperienced in various ways (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Commonly, the individual has recurrent, involuntary, and intrusive recollections of the event, considered Criterion B evidence (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). This client reports that she often ruminates about the experience with her first child, and can be overbearing and protective of her 4 year-old daughter. She says this often interferes with her everyday life, as she is too busy worrying about what could happen to her daughter. Intrusive recollections in PTSD are distinguished from depressive rumination in that they apply only to involuntary and intrusive distressing memories (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). The DSM-5 diagnosis of F43.12 PTSD would be appropriate for this client, as she often has distressing thoughts surrounding both traumatic incidents that interfere with her daily life.
NURS 6640 PRACTICUM TIME LOG AND JOURNAL Legal Implications: As a Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP), there will be many legal and ethical implications to consider when treating patients with mental illness. Creating a foundation of trust, with a non-judgemental attitude, is extremely important for this population. When individuals seek mental health care they are usually in a vulnerable position and deserve compassion and kindness. Another important implication to consider as a PMHNP is confidentiality. Confidentiality should be respected in all situations, and should never be broken unless the patient is a danger to themselves or others (American Nurses Association, 2014). In this case, it is important to document your assessment of the patient and to follow through if the risk is high (Wheeler, 2014). Every state has statues about the duty to report when a patient is a risk to themselves or others, and it is important to be aware of your state’s laws about how to manage these individuals safely (American Nurses Association, 2014). Issues relating to ethics, confidentiality, and scope of practice have become more complex with the advent of telepsychiatry, so it is important for PMHNP to also understand the legalities surrounding this resource (Wheeler, 2014).

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