more easily identify Tarrou as combating or rebelling against the existential

More easily identify tarrou as combating or rebelling

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more easily identify Tarrou as combating or rebelling against the existential belief in the futility of man’s existence. Like Tarrou, Rieux’s character development in the passage also has the similar effect of clarifying the theme of rebellion.
Though both characters can be identified as being a part of the endless struggle with the plague, Rieux differs from Tarrou in a number of ways. Firstly, as stated before Tarrou had an interest in becoming a saint, on the other hand Rieux replies that he has no interest in becoming asaint and that “heroism and sanctity don’t really appeal to me” (245). In other words, Rieux does not concern himself with gaining any recognition for his deeds and being considered to be noble or a “saint”. From this the reader gains a greater awareness of Rieux’s selflessness and therefore a greater awareness of his will to resist the plague. Rieux summarizes, “All I maintain is that on this earth there are pestilences and there are victims, and it's up to us, so far as possible, not to join forces with the pestilences” (243). At this point Rieux creates a direct contrast between thosewho choose to rebel against the plague and those who remain indifferent and complacent. This comparison had been drawn previously in the novel in a more abstract manner, but through Rieux summarization the reader is given a direct dichotomy. It is not only through the diction of Rieux and Tarrou that develop their character that Camus’ uses to convey the theme of rebellion, but also through the tone that encompasses the character development during the passage.Different to the majority of the novel, the passage conveys a varied tone by Camus. As a whole, the resilience of the resolve the characters Rieux and Tarrou against the plague can be identified with a tone of hope. For instance, “vigilance… never falter. The good man, the man who infects hardly anyone, is the man who has the fewest lapses of attention” (242). The diction and the use of words such as vigilance, a trait that both characters have, provide a hopeful tone. However the majority of the novel can be identified with a rather clinical and detached tone evenwhen describing the tragedy that is the plague. In addition to this, Camus has a negative and critical tone towards the Oran as a whole. For example, in part one the narration states “In our little town… all three [work, love and death] are done on much the same lines, with the same feverish yet casual air. The truth is that everyone is bored, and devotes himself to cultivating habits” (2). The tone of the narration has a clear sense of negativity and general criticism towardsthe complacency of the citizens of Oran and their submission to existential absurdity. The complacency of the citizens of Oran continue in the same manner even after the outbreak of the plague and the narration displays identical tone, “each individual citizen had gone about his business as usual” (63). Therefore because of the tone that surrounds the development of the characters of Rieux and Tarrou, the reader is able to heavily contrast the characters embodiment of the theme of rebellion and the complacency and acceptance of the citizens of Oran.

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