a vague mild expression that symbolizes something more blunt or harsh Sounds

A vague mild expression that symbolizes something

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a vague, mild expression that symbolizes something more blunt or harsh; Sounds less hard or less explicit than the term it stands for; Euphemisms change over time b. Ex: instead of saying someone had died we might say they have “passed away” c. Use them when talking about sensitive topics and don’t want others to feel embarrassed or offended d. Require understanding of cultural idioms (sleep together literal meaning, and then cultural euphemism for have sex) e. Good: provide people with way to talk about sensitive topics without having to use uncomfortable language; facilitate open communication by softening topic f. Bad: excessive use of euphemisms can desensitize people, causing them to accept situations they would otherwise find unacceptable; doublespeak - when euphemisms are used specifically to disguise or distort meaning (make people feel detached from or accepting of horrors of war); encourage us to tolerate what we might otherwise find intolerable 3) Slang: the language of Subcultures
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a.Slang: informal, unconventional words that are often understood only by others in a particular subcultureb.Slang helps people distinguish between those who do and don’t belong to their particular social networks; many social, cultural, and religious groups have their own terminology for certain ideas, and a person’s ability to use the slang appropriately can mark him or her as belonging to that groupc.Jargon: the technical vocabulary of a certain occupation or profession, allows members to communicate with one another precisely and efficientlyd.Slang or jargon are Neither inherently good or bade.Positive: reaffirm one’s membership within a particular social community, allows you to connect with others like youf.Negative: make people feel like outsiders, feel excluded from the conversation4)Defamation: Harmful Wordsa.Defamation:language that harms a person’s reputation or image; statement must be false, but could also be considered libel or slander is statement is true but disclosing it serves no prevailing public interest (telling people senator has HIV)b.2 forms:b.i.Libel: a defamatory statement made in print or in some other fixed mediumb.ii.Slander: a defamatory statement made aloud; more common in interpersonal communication like gossiping and spreading rumors5)Profanity: Offensive languagea.Profanity: a form of language considered vulgar, rude, or obscene in the context which it is usedb.Some profane terms meant to put down certain groups of people, attack religious beliefs or figures considered sacred by followers, describe sexual acts or refer to people’s sexual organs or bodily functions, general expression of anger or disappointmentc.Profanity is context-specific: what makes word profane is that it is considered rude or obscene in the language and context in which it is usedd.Negative: Makes people feel uncomfortable or insultede.Reclaiming the term: reduce the negative effects of certain profane terms by making the terms more commonplace, thus lowering their shock valuef.
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