Local laws and regulations in 2004 pennsylvania

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Local Laws and RegulationsIn 2004, Pennsylvania passed the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards Act. The act requires utilities in the state to buy a certain amount from alternative sources. By 2021, at least eight percent of companies need to have their power come from renewable sources, including windfarms which are in the “Tier 1” category. Tier 2 includes converted coal waste and larger hydroelectric projects (AEPS, n.d.). In 2010, the state had so much solar power that solar minimums needed to be higher and updated to continue with the growing market. In 2017, Pennsylvania’s Governor, Tom Wolf, signed Act 40 into law. It requires credits from a renewable facility in Pennsylvania to be distributed within the state. By doing this, the value of those credits increased, and the amount of credits has also improved.Time FrameThe amount of time it takes for a solar installation really depends on the location. For example, I live in a suburb area while my father lives in a very rural area. More than likely, it would take longer for him to get solar panels installed than it would for myself. If I were to start the process of installing solar on my roof today, it would start with researching a company. Ensuring that the company has a certified installer is important. This
Switching to Solar Energy in Residential Homes11could take a while, especially for someone like me who has 13 solar companies in a 20-minute radius. Determining budget and the type of solar installation that would best fit with me and my needs takes time. There are several factors to take into consideration, such as certifications within the companies, experience, testimonies from other customers, and what they cover with their products. Once a company is chosen, an installer must come to inspect my roof and collect information to determine the type of solar that is ideal for my home, including the energy needs for my home (Dilthey, M., n.d.). The next step is paperwork. Any necessary paperwork and steps can be completed with the help from the employee as well. After paperwork is finished, designing the solar system is thenext step. Depending on the size of the company, there would be a certified team or electricians and roofing specialists contracted outside the company to help with the installation process. However, in order to install a solar system, there must be a solar contractor, a master electrician, and a roofing contractor (Dilthey, M., n.d.). Once the design is created, I need to give the final approval before installation can begin. Depending on the design, this could take a week or two. The longest part of the process is submitting the permit and waiting for it to be approved. The permit is sent to my local planning board. The time it takes for permits to be approved depends on how invested towns are in the solar energy market and, thus, can take anywhere froma few days to a month, if not longer. An installers’ experience can help aid the time with this process.

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