Top hospital in san diego he has advice for those

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top hospital in San Diego, he has advice for those entering college: "Understand that there are several paths you can take during your college career. What works for some, may not work for you. It's amazing how much you grow during your college years if you remain open to new ideasand experiences."SURVIVAL STRATEGY: BALANCE SOCIALIZING AND STUDYING.If you're a social butterfly, don't feel as if you need to clip your wings. Allow your outgoing personality to work for you. For instance, put together a study group with a couple of compatiblepeers in your class. "Studies have shown that students learn best in a group setting, so take theinitiative and form a study group," says Tinto. "It's a fun and productive way to meet people and keep up with your work." Also, if your group meets on a set day at a set time, you'll be less likelyto neglect your studies because you won't want to let your group down.SURVIVAL STRATEGY: JOIN IN CAMPUS ACTIVITIES.College is the ideal time to try new things and diversify your interests. Write for the school newspaper, become active in student government, form a club, join a sports team, or get a part-time job at the library. "Understand that extracurricular activities are just as important as your studies when shaping a well-rounded college experience," says Robert Feldman, director of undergraduate studies in the department of psychology at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. "Get involved. Your college experience is what you make of it." Just be careful not to spread yourself too thin. After all, it's hard to focus on schoolwork--or any activity, for that matter--if you have too many things going at once.SURVIVAL STRATEGY: ASK FOR HELP.Professors, for the most part, are friendly folks who are more than willing to help a student in need. They can offer helpful insights and point you to outside resources that may be of further assistance, such as the university's guidance office, writing center, or a tutoring program. Also, by establishing a friendship with a professor, you'll see her as less of an obstacle and more as amentor. "The best thing I did my freshman year was introduce myself to all of my professors, no matter how well or poorly I was doing in their class," says Stanton. "I formed many friendships with professors; in fact, one helped me get an internship." For more academic advice, see page 32.SURVIVAL STRATEGY: LOOK BEYOND THE MONEY ISSUE."Oftentimes, money is masking another problem," says Tinto. "I speak to several kids every yearwho claim to be leaving school because they can't afford it. But in truth they're having difficulties adjusting either socially or academically--sometimes both--to college life."However, if money matters remain the primary reason why you want to leave college, rememberthis: College graduates, on average, earn nearly twice as much per year as those with just a
high school diploma, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Also, by staying in school, you build contacts with friends and professors that could lead to lucrative summer internships and potential post-graduate job opportunities.

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