He believed that blacks needed to become educated in trades to gain self

He believed that blacks needed to become educated in

This preview shows page 23 - 36 out of 86 pages.

He believed that blacks needed to become educated in trades to gain self-respect and economic security. He believed that education and proven acceptance would bring blacks political and civil rights.
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Election of 1892 The Republicans renominated Harrison The Democrats went with Cleveland, who had proved his conservatism and opposition to the Populists Populists nominated former Greenback Labor Party candidate and Civil War general, James B. Weaver Populists elected five Senators, ten Congressmen, and three governors, but lost support in the South due to racism. Cleveland edged out the victory because of his support of the gold standard and Harrison’s involvement in putting down the Homestead Strike and passing the McKinley Tariff
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Cleveland Breeds a Backlash Panic of 1893 Put down the Pullman Strike Coxey’s Army Repeal of the Sherman Silver Purchasing Act $62 million loan from J.P Morgan Wilson-Gorman Tariff of 1894 Pollock v. Farmers’ Loan & Trust Co. (1895) Democratic Party splits; Free-Silver v. the Bourbons
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Election of 1896 Repulsed by Cleveland’s conservative actions and the gains in Congress by the Republicans in 1894, the Democrats nominated William Jennings Bryan. They supported a free-silver platform. Seeing their main argument taken by the Democrats, the Populists endorsed Bryan The Republicans nominated former congressman, William McKinley Despite Bryan’s whirl-wind speech making tours compared to McKinley’s “front-porch” campaign, McKinley won.
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Why Did Bryan Lose? Mark Hanna, a Cleveland industrialist, built McKinley’s campaign around propaganda, not the candidate Corporations bought the election (Rockefeller and Morgan contributed half a million dollars to McKinley) Industrial workers feared retaliation from corporate heads, inflation from free-silver, and less protection from a lowered tariff Urban voters feared higher food prices with inflation Catholics and Jews saw Bryan as a teetotaling Protestant.
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McKinley: Mandate of the People Dingley Tariff of 1897 – raised the tariff above the Wilson-Gorman tariff to 46.5% Currency Act of 1900 – also called the Gold Standard Act, provided that paper currency could be redeemed freely in gold. Gold deposits found in Alaska, South Africa, and Australia, as well as, a new cyanide process to extract low- grade ore caused natural inflation. Death of the Populists
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Looking Abroad As America bustled with a new sense of power generated by the strong growth in population, wealth, and productive capacity, labor violence and agrarian unrest increased. It was felt that overseas markets might provide a safety valve to relieve these pressures.
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Imperialism This is the practice of extending the power, control or rule by one country over areas outside its borders.
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