Extend and vary the lesson make an actual diagram of

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Extend and Vary the Lesson Make an actual diagram of the NCAA basketball court. • Make a model of another NCAA sports court using standard English measures. Have students recommend different scale factors they might use and then discuss which of these might be the best choice. Visit to locate various NCAA playing surfaces. Invite an architect, a blueprint maker or a surveyor to the class to talk about their careers and tell students about the math they use in their work. • Compute the areas and perimeters of different sections of the court using actual measures of the court. Compute the distance of the court from the surrounding walls and make a three- dimensional model of the court. References Benson, M., ed. 2001. Men’s and Women’s Illustrated Basketball Rules and Interpreta- tions. Indianapolis: National Collegiate Athletic Association.
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From NCAA Basketball Fast Break: Lessons Across the Curriculum With the NCAA, © 2003, NCAA. 199 Figuring the Metric Dimensions for a Model Court Name_____________________________________________ Date______________________ How is a basketball player different from a romantic actor? Find the answer to the riddle as you check your work. To make a scale model of a basketball court, first convert each measurement of the actual court to the measurement that will be used for the model. Using a scale of 1 cm to 4 ft will produce a diagram that fits nicely on an 8 1/2- by 11-inch sheet of paper. Find the Measures 1. Look at the diagram of the basketball court and find the actual measurements for each part of the court. Record your answers under the Actual measurement column on the chart on page 200. 2. Convert the actual measurement to the measurement needed for the model. Since the scale is 1 cm to 4 ft, multiply each foot measure by 1 cm/4 ft. Change measures given in inches to feet by multiplying by 1 ft/12 in. Round the final answer to the nearest tenth of a centimeter. Re- cord your answers in the Measurement of model column on the chart on page 200. 3. Show your work on a separate piece of paper. After you have solved all of the measurements, find your answer to each question in the following list. In the box below the list, write the letter that corresponds to the question number. Doing this will solve the riddle!
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From NCAA Basketball Fast Break: Lessons Across the Curriculum With the NCAA, © 2003, NCAA. 200 4 ft = R 6 ft = I 12 ft = P 19 ft = R 19 ft 9 in = L 50 ft = S 94 ft = C 9 in = N 63 in = Y 72 in = O .2 cm = O .4 cm = M 1 cm = U 1.3 cm = E 1.5 cm = A 3 cm = N 4.75 cm = P 4.9 cm = H 12.5 cm = T 23.5 cm = D Part of court Actual measurement Measurement of model Length of side line 1. 11. Length of end line 2. 12. Radius of center circle 3. 13. Parallel part of 3-point line 4. 14. Radius of 3-point line 5. 15. Radius of basket 6. 16. Distance of backboard from end line 7. 17. Length of backboard 8. 18.
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  • Fall '17
  • Statistics, National Collegiate Athletic Association, Basketball Fast Break, NCAA Basketball Fast

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