When you think about the goals of lean manufacturing

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When you think about the goals of lean manufacturing and sustainability, the two are very synergistic. Continuous improvement efforts in lean are focused on the elimination of non-value-added waste to produce exactly what the customer wants, when they want it, in the quantity they specify -- and to use the minimum amount of time, material, space and labor to accomplish this at the lowest possible cost. Sustainability is all about minimising the use of natural resources like materials, energy and even replenishable biomass resources like trees, while reducing solid waste and hazardous materials from our production processes and minimizing our carbon footprint. All of these resource inputs to our manufacturing operations have a cost, so reducing their use is a cost-reduction effort that improves profitability. In addition to reducing cost, the commitment to sustainability can be motivational for your employees, many of whom are concerned about our planet's future and the lifestyle we will leave behind for future generations. Quality and Quality Management Models Quality management ensures that an organization, product or service is consistent. It has four main components: quality planning, quality control , assurance and quality improvement. Quality management is focused not only on product and service quality , but also on the means to achieve it. Quality management, therefore, uses quality assurance and control of processes as well as products to achieve more consistent quality. There are eight different basic elements of Total Quality Management (TQM). These elements are necessary to ensure that the model is implemented successfully. Without each and every single element put into place, it is likely that the business or the quality assurance program will experience some degree of failure. These basic elements include the following: 1. Communication 2. Basic Ethics 3. Recognition 4. Integrity 5. Teamwork 2
6. Leadership 7. Trust 8. Training These core elements are believed to be the ultimate “foundation” to success when it comes to successful operations in the business, or the quality assurance program. Many have concluded that this system works in much the same method that a composition of a home works. Here are five examples of sustainability principles: 1. Expect change and learn to welcome it; be resilient. 2. Know your business: know your purpose, core strengths, source of value, and everything about your customers and competition. 3. Share what you know; eliminate all obstacles to open and honest communication. 4. Learn to focus on opportunities; approach each day with optimism to see ways to create value, improve efficiencies. 5. Own your success; build a plan and work it each day. Reference: John Spence. January 15 th , 2011 - economy/ BACKGROUND I have decided to choose the two contrasting views on sustainability from a business point of view.

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