The states have equal representation in the legislature and choose its members

The states have equal representation in the

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The states have equal representation in the legislature and choose its members. A multiperson executive be elected by the legislature, with powers similar to those proposed under The Virginia Plan but without the right to veto legislation. A supreme tribunal be created with limited jurisdiction. The actions of the legislature be binding on the states they be regarded as “the supreme law of the respective states,” with the option of force to compel obedience. Major Differences Between the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan Characteristic Virginia Plan New Jersey Plan Legislature Two chambers One chamber Legislative power Derived from the people Derived from the states Executive Unspecified size More than one person Decision rule Majority Extraordinary majority State laws Legislature can override National law is supreme 6
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Executive removal By Congress By a majority of the states Courts National Judiciary No provision for national judiciary Ratification By the people By the states The Great Compromise: submitted by the Connecticut delegation to the Constitution Convention of 1787, and thus also known as the Connecticut Compromise, a plan calling for a bicameral legislature in which the House of Representatives would be apportioned according to population and the states would be represented equally in the Senate. No amendment to the Constitution could violate the equal state representation principle. Representation in the House of Representatives would be apportioned according to the population of each state. Key positions/arguments of the Federalists and Antifederalists. Federalists: Wanted a strong national government. Believed that additional separation of powers and additional checks and balances would make decisive national action virtually impossible. Antifederalists: Wanted to protect the states from the tyranny of a strong national government. Attacked centralization of power in a strong national government claimed it would obliterate the states, violate the social contract of the Declaration of Independence, and destroy liberty in the process. Defended the status quo. Articles of Confederation established true federal principles. Wanted additional separation of powers and additional checks and balances would eliminate the threat of tyranny entirely. Main points of Federalist Papers #10 and #51. Federalist Papers #10: Purpose was to demonstrate that the proposed government was not likely to be dominated by any faction . Contrary to conventional wisdom, Madison argued, the key to mending the evils of factions is to have a large republic the larger, the better. The more diverse the society, the less likely it is than an unjust majority can form.
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  • Spring '17
  • UNKNOWN
  • Government, United States Congress, ​ immunity

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