Although it wasnt instant the fields began to glow

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water the ground again. Although it wasn't instant, the fields began to glow with golden wheat and America's slowly started filling again with joy. President Roosevelt and his New Deal tried to ease the pains of the farmers. Roosevelt's program was a practical response to the depression. He first addressed the banking crisis. Congress passed the Emergency Banking Act, which was a conservative measure that extended government assistance to sound banks and reorganized the weak ones. He also talked about the banks over the radio trying to restore confidence in the banks. He also provided relief to the farmers by establishing the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA). The objective was to boost farm prices to a level that would restore farmers’ purchasing power. The New Deal offered special benefits to the South. Roosevelt's New Deal came to a holt in 1938. With the Republicans gaining seventy-five seats in the House and sevenin the Senate along with thirteen governorships Roosevelt lost his political leverage. WithRoosevelt as president and his opponents controlling Congress, The new Deal was over 7
and a political standstill. The Supreme Court ruled the AAA unconstitutional in 1936. Congress responded by passing the Soil Conservation and Domestic Allotment Act of 1936, which paid farmers to plant "soil-conserving" crops such as soybeans, or they could leave their land fallow. The AAA helped to lift the burden put on many farmers during the dirty 1930's, but the almost every farmer suffered greatly due to the drought, their farming, and dust storms. Despite the serious shortcomings, the early AAA program so improve the relative position of most farmers that it was popular among them. The Farm Bureau Federation and the Grange strongly supported it and favored more not less, regulatory legislation. As for the sub marginal farmers, floundering in desperate poverty, especially in the South, the New Deal seemed almost the only hope.15This havoc changed the way people viewed the environment. When the nation realized how much the Dust Bowl was interfering in the lives of the Southern plains farmers they began to take action. Luckily it was not too late. Hugh Bennett was the leader of the "Soil Conservation." He argued that farming techniques could restore what the Dust Bowl had destroyed. Bennett took his case to Capital Hill. While he was there, he learned that a sand storm was headed towards the east coast. The government said that the soil was a indestructible resource. By 1937 Washington held a campaign to adopt newfarming methods to help preserve the soil. As soon as farmers leered about these new techniques they began to fight back. Farmers had to plow the fields from dawn to dusk to restore the land to its natural state. By doing this, farmers had reduced the amount of blowing dust by 65%. The Dust Bowl has changed the attitude of the Southern Plain farmers. The Dust Bowl taught the farmers and the nation as a whole to view the land as very fragile and to expect the unexpected. Hugh Hammond Bennett, of the U.S.

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