Obras publicas was never completed and used for

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obras publicas was never completed and used for carriages because the local polistas revolted out of the oppressive supervison of the Franciscan friar. The stone bridge has been called by the locals as Tulay de Pigi because the politas were whipped in their buttocks just to compel them to work. Majayjay had a great significance to the Franciscan missionaries because it was at their pathway from Bicol to Manila. In fact, it was their place of rest before they would continue their journey to Manila (GMA 7 News and Public Affairs, 2013). The building of bridges or puentes, including roads or caminos in the country was initially made by the religious congregations assigned to a particular jurisdiction. These friars were neither trained engineers nor builders; that was why there was uncertainty if his hand-sketched design would be translated into a formidable structure. But because of practical skills and knowledge learned in Europe and because of their basic understanding of Renaissance building techniques, as well as a pattern book brought in from Mexico or Europe, the construction of lasting bridges still commenced (del Castillo-Noche, 2016). The friars took the risk of being the first engineers and architects because of the necessity of spreading Catholicism through the construction of churches, roads and bridges. Due to the increasing demands of political and economic activities as well in the Philippines, specialized engineers from Spain were soon necessary. This led to the
establishment of Inspección General de Obras Publicas (the General Board of Public Works) by a Royal Decree in 1866 (del Castillo-Noche, 2016). The decree allowed the more scientific and effective construction of structures to last a lifetime. Building these structures however required the Filipinos‘ participation. They were conscripted by their local officials— Figure 23. The Puente de España. (Gopal, 2013) either by their gobernadorcillos or cabezas de barangay or, in some instances, competent principales . Working on these structures, bridges and roads especially, was very difficult. In the case of bridges, the polistas had to employ the classical designs of Europe of which most basic is the Roman arch, taught upon them by the friar-engineer-architects (Villalon, 2011). Working conditions in the designated places were severe. The polistas had to quarry huge stones and shape them into cubic forms. Since these stones were durable, they had a high demand in the construction of buildings. These stones were quarried in mountains and were brought to the work place with the use of local carts by numerous able-bodied men. These stones would then be cut precisely into cubic shapes of different sizes in order to form arches that would serve as the support system of the bridges‘ surface. The Roman arch had a better benefit, likewise, because it allowed the use of its spandrel by small canoes used by the Filipinos in travelling elsewhere or in fishing along the river.

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