Question 14 a the sussex pledge included a promise by

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Question 14 a. The Sussex pledge included a promise by Germany that it would not sink all passenger ships, including British-owned passenger ships, and merchant vessels without giving warning. The Sussex pledge meant that Americans could freely travel on British-owned passenger ships in the Atlantic without being subject to a preemptive submarine attack by German naval vessels. b. German U-Boats (submarines) would normally not surface to capture merchant vessels. German U-Boats depended on maintaining stealth to be effective and were vulnerable to being rammed or sunk by a merchant vessel or by one of the surface naval ships escorting the merchant vessel through the Atlantic. c. Germany did not require that the American government would have to guarantee that all passenger vessels were not secretly carrying military supplies as part of the Sussex pledge. According to the pledge, German naval ships still retained the right to inspect, seize, and sink passenger ships they believed to be carrying war munitions for the Allied cause, after German naval officers had guaranteed the safety of compliant passengers and crew. d. Correct answer. Germany attached the contingency of President Wilson persuading the Allies to end their naval blockade of Germany to its Sussex pledge of agreeing not to sink passenger ships and merchant vessels without giving warning. President Wilson immediately accepted the German pledge to cease engaging in unrestricted submarine warfare on passenger ships and merchant vessels, without assenting to the contingent pledge obligation of persuading the British to end its naval blockade of Germany. This diplomatic result represented only a temporary and unstable diplomatic achievement for President Wilson because Germany could now decide to resume unrestricted submarine warfare and drag the United States into war, whenever German frustration with the continued naval blockade became unbearable. e. President Wilson’s pro-British views led Germany to reject the president’s offer to serve as a mediator between the Central Powers and Allies to reach a negotiated settlement of the war.
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