Lecture4-SelectiveAttention.pptx

32 evidence for location based and object based

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Evidence for Location-Based and Object-Based Attention: Inhibition of Return Location-Based - If we have looked at a particular region of space , we find it harder to return our attention to that region. Object-Based - If we have looked at a particular object, we find it harder to return our attention to that object , even if it has moved to another (new) location. 33
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Demonstration of Location-Based Inhibition of Return 34
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Demonstration of Location-Based Inhibition of Return Step 1 - show three squares 35
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Demonstration of Location-Based Inhibition of Return Step 1 - show three squares Step 2 - flicker one of the outer squares (indicated in blue) 36
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Demonstration of Location-Based Inhibition of Return Step 1 - show three squares Step 3 - flicker the center square 37 Step 2 - flicker one of the outer squares (indicated in blue)
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Demonstration of Location-Based Inhibition of Return Step 1 - show three squares Step 3 - flicker the center square Step 4 - flicker one of the two outer squares; participant responds as quickly as possible to this final flicker either this... …or this 38 Step 2 - flicker one of the outer squares (indicated in blue)
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Demonstration of Location-Based Inhibition of Return Step 1 - show three squares Step 3 - flicker the center square Step 4 - flicker one of the two outer squares; participant responds as quickly as possible to this final flicker either this... …or this Slower when square in same location is flickered again 39 Step 2 - flicker one of the outer squares (indicated in blue)
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Demonstration of Object-Based Inhibition of Return 40
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Demonstration of Object-Based Inhibition of Return 41
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Demonstration of Object-Based Inhibition of Return 42
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Demonstration of Object-Based Inhibition of Return 43
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Demonstration of Object-Based Inhibition of Return 44
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Demonstration of Object-Based Inhibition of Return 45
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Demonstration of Object-Based Inhibition of Return Participants are slower to respond to flickering of the object in this location, even though the location was not flickered before. However, the object that was flickered initially has moved to this location. 46
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How do location - and object - based attention work together in the real world? How does our prior knowledge of the world help guide how we attend to information within it? 47
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Neisser’s Research on Context Efects in Attention to Visual Scenes Viewers can attend to one scene or the other, but not both 48
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One way to reduce the amount of attentional processing that is devoted to a particular task or process is to make that task or process more automatic . 49
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Shifrin & Schneider’s Paradigm for Studying Controlled Versus Automatic Allocation of Attention 50
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Target 51 Frames Same-category condition Shifrin & Schneider’s Paradigm for Studying Controlled Versus Automatic Allocation of Attention
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