Once inside a hospital hispanics and other culturally

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permitted if the head male allows it. Once inside a hospital, Hispanics and other culturally different people tend to be treated with a type of disrespect as there is a stigma that surrounds immigration in our country, which instills a fear of the American health system. Hispanics who are non-English speaking experience a lack of communication with the medical staff, who often do not make enough of an effort to provide an interpreter (CDC's Healthy Communities Program, n.d.). A community-oriented approach would be to educate Hispanics about the importance of preventive careand inform them of common warning signs and symptoms of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other health-related problems. This will allow this culture to identify serious problems early on, hopefully reducing the amount of emergency room visits and increasing preventive health. Policy makers within the community should also improve the physician-patient relationship by stressing the importance of language sensitivity and communication, which would mean employing more bilingual physicians or having interpreters readily available (Burkholder & Nash, 2013).From a market-oriented standpoint, physician's offices within the community should allow more access for Medicare and Medicaid patients instead of singling them out due to a decreased amount in

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