At the same time the Chinese government has not been doing enough when it comes

At the same time the chinese government has not been

This preview shows page 112 - 114 out of 127 pages.

At the same time, the Chinese government has not been doing enough when it comes to protecting foreign intellectual property in China. Copyright enforcement is still weak , and US companies are forced to transfer technologies to Chinese counterparts as a condition of doing business in the country. This is estimated to cost American businesses hundreds of billions of dollars a year. But China is unlikely to end industrial subsidies or increase enforcement of intellectual property laws in any meaningful way in the short run. In part this is because the Chinese economy is growing more slowly than at any other time in the last two decades, and any significant change in policy would be risky .
Image of page 112
3 – Arms sales don’t hurt relations – US-China ties are always restored Lingwall 15 Noah Lingwall, writing for The Diplomat, student at the Schreyer Honors College of the Pennsylvania State University and an intern at the Strategic Studies Institute of the U.S. Army War College. The Taiwan Problem: If It Ain't Broke, Don't Fix It A grand bargain between the U.S. and China over Taiwan seems an ill-conceived idea. August 08, 2015 Myth #1: Taiwan Is an Obstacle to Better U.S.-China Relations Glaser and others who espouse the benefits of a U.S.-China grand bargain allege that the unresolved question of Taiwanese independence has impeded healthy U.S.-China relations . To test this assertion, it is important to consider the reality of recent China-Taiwan interactions. The issues of Taiwan’s disputed status and U.S. arms sales to Taiwan remain perhaps the most outstanding problems between the United States and China. Still, even these issues no longer impede U.S.-China relations . The question of Taiwanese independence emerged in the 1990s with the nation’s transition to democracy. As the pro- independence Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) gained control over Taiwan in subsequent elections, then-President Chen Shui-bian amplified Taiwan’s calls for independence. The 2005 passage of the Anti-Secession Law* in China served as a sharp response to Taiwan’s ambitions for independence. Meanwhile, former President George W. Bush clarified the U.S. position of “strategic ambiguity” over the Taiwan issue with a powerful proclamation: The United States would not want to see Taiwan provoke China, but the United States would help defend Taiwan if China were to lose its patience with Taiwan and use force to achieve unification with the island. This statement made it clear that the United States did not support either formal Taiwanese independence or forceful unification. This policy position effectively stabilized the status quo in the Taiwan Strait. Since then, no further attempts have been made to upend the balance between China and Taiwan.
Image of page 113
Image of page 114

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 127 pages?

  • Summer '14
  • Republic of China, Political status of Taiwan

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture