that China was punished for its opposition to British might while the British

That china was punished for its opposition to british

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that China was punished for its opposition to British might, while the British offered/guaranteed not a single obligation to China. Jean Cocteau wrote in his 1933 novel about his use of Opium that it: “…leads the organism towards death in euphoric mood” (p.16). In researching the first opium wars, one gets the sense that like Cocteau, 12 million Chinese men under the age of forty were also being led towards death in a euphoric mood. The British, with their demands for merchandise and no way to pay for it, became the leaders of these men – walking them towards death and watching them smiling. By exploitation the British increased their wealth and left behind a nation of 12 million opium addicts, zombies who served no man, no government, and no use. When those who valuedthe souls of the countrymen over the profits of smugglers and dealers finally made a stance and set alight the evil that had overtaken his country, the British went to war to protect their interests. A the conclusion of this war, the treaty of Nanjing gave unalienable rights to the drug dealers andpunished those who sought to protect their nation from sticky flood of Indian Opium which had pervaded every aspect of their society. The British kept their ships, loaded with combustible euphoria rolling into the ports of China, where hungry lungs gathered and waited, while empathetic souls like Lin Zexu sat and watched the future of their country rise from opium pipes and be forever born on the breeze.
IMPERIAL PHANTASMAGORIA – A BRIEF LOOK AT THE OPIUM WARS6ReferencesCocteau, J., & ERNEST, B. (1933). OPIUM. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 78(6), 672.Gray, J. (2002). Rebellions and Revolutions: China from the 1800s to 2000. Oxford University Press Hanes, W. T., & Sanello, F. (2004). Opium wars: the addiction of one empire and the corruptionof another. Sourcebooks, Inc..Hsi, C., & Fairbank, J. K. (1944). Chang Hsi and the Treaty of Nanking, 1842:" Fu-i Jih Chi", byChang Hsi. Annotated Translation by Ssu-Yü Têng... Preface by JK Fairbank. University ofChicago Press..Treaty [Def. 2]. (n.d.). In Merriam Webster Online, Retrieved November 16, 2015, from Wordsworth, W., Foster, M. B., & Humphreys, H. N. (1859). The White Doe of Rylstone: Or, The Fate of the Nortons. Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts.

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