gets an A is 4 1 What is the probability that seven or fewer students receive

Gets an a is 4 1 what is the probability that seven

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gets an A is .4. (1) What is the probability that seven or fewer students receive A’s?(2) What is the probability that more than seven students receive A’s?(3) What is the probability that between 5 and 9 students (inclusive) will receive A’s? Solution k =20 5 Edward Fox and John Semple, 2020
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MAST 6478 Data Analytics For part (3), we will use Excel’s function BINOM.DIST.RANGE( n , p , k lower , k upper ). This function computes the probability of between k lower and k upper successes in n trials, including k lower and k upper . Be careful to enter k lower and k upper in the function so that it reflects the range of successes that you are interested in. The Normal Distribution The mean and the variance (or alternatively the standard deviation) completely describe a normal distribution Norm.dist.range is NOT an excel function used for normal distribution calculations The sum of normal distributions has a normal distribution When a random variable X can take on any value in an interval, we call it a continuous random variable and describe the outcomes (which are too numerous to count) using a probability density function or PDF. Instead of talking about the probability that X takes on a specific value as we do with discrete distributions, with continuous distributions we talk about the probability that X falls within an interval such as [0, 10] or, more generally, [ c , d ]. We write the general probability Pr ( c X d ) . The probability that X falls in the interval [ c , d ] is the area under the PDF curve that is bounded on the left by c , on the right by d , and below by the x -axis. For continuous distributions, probability corresponds to the area under the curve.
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  • Fall '17
  • Normal Distribution, Probability distribution, Probability theory, Cumulative distribution function, John Semple, Edward Fox

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