4_2 Case Study Maria Lopez_Reeder.docx

Ptsd and major depressive disorder mdd have a

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 5 pages.

PTSD and Major depressive disorder (MDD) have a bidirectional relationship with each other and can occur from a shared vulnerability or “shared diathesis” (Angelakis & Nixon, 2015 p. 2). This being that you can have a prior diagnosis of MDD and experience a traumatic event
Image of page 2

Subscribe to view the full document.

Case Study: Maria Lopez 3 that triggers PTSD or have a prior diagnosis of PTSD from a traumatic event which later leads to MDD. “Major depressive disorder (MDD) is often comorbid with PTSD, occurring in as many as 50% of women with PTSD” (Calhoun, Wiley, Dennis, Beckham, 2009 p.123). Depression is characterized by the symptoms of feeling sadness or low mood lasting more than a few days. Major Depression Disorder (MDD) is “a syndrome characterized by the cardinal symptoms of sadness or of loss of pleasure and interest, coupled with somatic symptoms such as problems with weight, fatigue, sleep, and concentration” (Eaton, 2012 p. 16). The symptoms of MDD can cause complications with a person’s ability to be social, as well as be productive in their occupation or jobs, or any other important areas that are necessary for function in life (Eaton, 2012 p. 17). With Maria, there isn’t an explanation of an exposure or experience with a traumatic situation, but the loss of her job and being antisocial with her parents could be symptoms from her diagnoses of MDD. Like PTSD, MDD is more prevalent in women within mid 30s and the comorbidity is linked with poor health. Maria Lopez has been diagnosed with, Diabetes, Hypertension and obesity and they have a correlation with PTSD and MDD. In fact, PTSD has a correlation with cardiovascular disease from the psychological symptoms which increase obesity and metabolic disease (Calhoun, Wiley, Dennis, Beckham, 2009 p.128). MDD has a significantly high correlation with Type II diabetes and hypertension.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4
  • Fall '17
  • Psychological trauma, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Maria Lopez

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern