Fewer committees and subcommittees Procedures Bills

Fewer committees and subcommittees procedures bills

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Fewer committees and subcommittees Legislative/Committee Procedures Bills introduced into "the hopper" and referred to committee by the Speaker Speaker may create ad hoc committees Committee action more influential than floor action for final decision Scheduling generally controlled by majority party leadership and Rules Committee Rigid floor debate rules favor majority (debate limits set by Rules Committee) Bills introduced (may be introduced directly on the floor) and normally referred to committee by majority leader No ad hoc committees may be created Floor action as important as committee action for final decision Scheduling generally mutually agreed by majority and minority leaders Flexible floor debate rules protect minority (debate limits rare, set by full Senate via unanimous consent or cloture) Changes in the Institution (1990s-2000s) Power centralized in the Speaker's inner circle of advisors House procedures are becoming more efficient Those seeking reelection Senate workload increasing and informally breaking down, threat of filibusters more frequent than in the past Becoming more difficult to pass legislation
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4 almost always win Turnover is moderate The House of Representatives and the Senate differ in constitutional powers, the structure of each chamber is different as well as each chamber’s procedures. The bottom row of the table, changes in the constitution, also highlight the changes that have happened in the past century. Powers Granted to Congress and the President Under the Constitution The main power granted to Congress is the power of Legislation or creating laws. However, congressional powers consist of many more and all can be divided into three categories: enumerated, implied, or inherent. An enumerated power is one that is explicitly stated in the Constitution. An implied power is one not specifically detailed in the Constitution but is inferred as necessary to achieve the objectives of the national government. An inherent power is assumed to exist as a direct result of the countries existence (Krutz, 2017, para.11). Enumerated powers include the power to collect taxes, declare war, raise an army and navy, coin money, borrow money, regulate commerce, establish federal courts and bankruptcy rules, establish rules for immigration and naturalization, and issue patents and copyright (Krutz, 2017, para.11). Under Article 2, Section 7 of the Constitution it states that Congress also has the power to override a veto by the President with a two-thirds vote in the House and in the Senate.
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  • Fall '15
  • United States Congress, United States Senate, United States House of Representatives

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