Classification hormone Increase blood glucose Complications nausea vomiting

Classification hormone increase blood glucose

  • MCPHS University
  • NUR 208
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Classification: hormone Increase blood glucose Complications: nausea, vomiting, hypotension Route: IV, IM, SubQ Levothyroxine (Synthroid) Classification: hormone Replacement in hypothyroidism to restore normal hormonal balance; suppression of thyroid cancer Complications: Route: PO, IM, IV *Tablets can be crushed and placed in 5-10 mL of water Diabetes : disorder of the endocrine system where the body does not make enough insulin to help control your blood glucose levels Symptoms: polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia, headache, not feeling well in general, increased fatigue, blurred vision related to fluid build-up in eyes or high glucose level Hypoglycemia : blood sugar is too low, usually 60-70 mg/dL In normal people if your body sugar drops your body stops releasing insulin; but if you are diabetic, your body doesn’t shut off insulin that you are injecting Causes: too much insulin, too little food or late, too much exercise, alcohol on an empty stomach, didn’t check blood sugar or adjust correctly Symptoms: shakiness, anxiety, nervous, sweating, chills, blurred vision, clammy, irritable, lightheaded, increased heart rate, hunger, sleepy, lack of coordination, headache, tingling in lips/tongue, confused, seizure, unconscious Treat with glucagon, orange juice, raisins, regular soda, jelly beans, sugar or honey Check sugar 15 minutes after treating hypoglycemia Dawn Phenomenon In response to the normal mechanism that wakes us up, your body releases hormones that decrease insulin activity everyday between 4 and 8AM, this can lead to high blood sugars and high ketones in the AM Hyperglycemia : blood sugar is too high, usually greater than 150-200 mg/dL Not enough insulin, so liver may produce too much glucose and ketones to go into the blood Can occur related to stress, illness, missed insulin, blocked pump tubing Symptoms: increased thirst, headache, trouble concentrating, blurred vision, frequent peeing, fatigue, weakness, weight loss Insulin : hormone made by the beta cells of the pancreas to help the body use glucose for energy by moving it into the cells The goal to taking insulin as a drug is to mimic normal insulin release depending upon your blood sugar; also helps to prevent liver from releasing too much glucose and helps make proteins in the body Injection sites For quicker absorption: abdomen For slower absorption: arms For even slower absorption: thighs/butt
*Rotate sites or scarring can occur Definitions Onset: length of time it takes for the insulin to reach the blood and start to work Peak: time the drug is at its maximum strength to work to decrease sugar levels Duration: length of time the drug works to decrease sugar levels overall Basal insulin: intermediate or long acting; absorbed slowly and gives the body slow, low level of insulin to manage blood sugar Bolus insulin: an extra amount to cover an unexpected rise in sugar Long acting Basal Example: Glargine (lantus) Starts to work 2-4 hours after injection, lasts up to 24 hours Intermediate Has elements of both basal and bolus Example: NPH (Humulin-N) Works 2-4 hours after injection, peaks 4-10 hours, duration is 16 hours

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