3 The US Cavalry was sent in to maintain some semblance of order By the 1890s

3 the us cavalry was sent in to maintain some

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3. The U.S. Cavalry was sent in to maintain some semblance of order. By the 1890’s this temporary arrangement had become permanent. 4. According to Schullery, if the Army hadn’t been sent in, Yellowstone wouldn’t have made it. How did soldiers deal with people who left their names and other graffiti on the landmarks? Made them scrub their names off 5. The army was hampered by the fact that the federal park existed in something of a legal no- man‘s-land; usually their only recourse was a warning, or in the most serious cases, expulsion from the park. 6. The cavalry was also in charge of the nation’s three other national parks. Each spring, troops stationed at the Presidio in San Francisco would make the two-week, 250-mile ride to the Sierras and patrol the three parks during the summer season. Some of them were African-Americans— the celebrated Buffalo Soldiers who had made a name for themselves in the Indian wars.
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7. Their commander was Captain Charles Young, born into slavery in Kentucky, whose father had escaped bondage during the Civil War to enlist in the Union army. Young followed his father’s example of military service. What was noteworthy about his achievements? 3 rd black man to gradate from West Point and the 1 st to be in charge of a National Park 8. As Superintendent of Sequoia, what did Captain Young have his men do during the summer months that encouraged access to the park and also helped to protect it? Complete first wagon road into the forest, built trail to Whitney, erected fences around trees, etc. 9. Like their counterparts at Yellowstone, the troops in California had to operate without clear legal authority and therefore invented techniques to protect their parks. Explain what they did. Held visitor’s rifles during their visits, move sheep to east and herders to west for illegal grazing 10. No one was more thankful for the Army’s presence than John Muir . 11. John Muir wrote, “Through all the wonderful, eventful centuries since Christ’s time—and long before that—God has cared for these trees, saved them from drought, disease, avalanches, and a thousand straining, leveling tempests and floods; but he cannot save them from fools—only Uncle Sam can do that.” 12. In 1892, to help promote Yosemite’s protection, Muir and a small group of prominent Californians formed a new organization. What did they call it? The Sierra Club 13. Who served as its president? John Muir Episode 2, Chapter 5 “For Ourselves and Our Children” 1. By the 1890s, few Americans understood as keenly as George Bird Grinnell how fearful the price had been for the nation’s relentless expansion across the continent. He was raised on the estate of the famous painter and naturalist John James Audubon. Travelling across Kansas, he had once encountered a buffalo herd so vast that his train was forced to stop for three hours while the beasts crossed the tracks.
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