ECE _ DSST Organizational Behavior

Horizontal communications are often necessary to save

Info iconThis preview shows pages 36–38. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Horizontal communications are often necessary to save time and facilitate coordination. In some cases, these lateral relationships are formally sanctioned by the organization Communication networks define the channels by which information flows. Formal networks are task-related communications that follow the authority chain. Common small-group networks include the chain, wheel, and all channel. The chain rigidly follows the formal chain of command. The wheel relies on the leader to act as the central conduit for all the group’s communication. The all-channel network permits all group members to actively communicate with each other. In the informal network, information flows along the well-known grapevine and rumors can flourish. The grapevine has three main characteristics. First, it isn’t controlled by management. Second, it is perceived by most employees as being more reliable and believable than messages issued by top management. Third, it is largely used to serve the self-interests of those people within it. The wheel communication network relies on the leader to act as the central conduit for all the group’s communication. Common small-group networks include the chain, wheel, and all channel. The chain communication network rigidly follows the formal chain of command . In contrast to this, the all-channel network permits all group members to actively communicate with each other Nonverbal communications are messages conveyed through body movements. This includes the intonations or emphasis that is given to certain words, facial expressions, and the physical distance between the sender and the receiver. The academic study of body movements is called kinesics. It has been argued that every body movement has a meaning. Body language adds to and often complicates verbal communication. A body position or movement does not by itself have a precise meaning, but when it is linked with spoken language, it gives fuller meaning to a sender’s message. The way individuals space themselves in terms of physical distance has nonverbal meanings. What is considered proper spacing largely depends on cultural norms. For example, what is “businesslike” distance in some European countries would be viewed as “intimate” in many parts of North America. If someone stands closer to a person than is considered appropriate, it may indicate aggressiveness or sexual interest. If farther away than usual, it may mean disinterest or displeasure with what is being said Filtering refers to a sender manipulating information so it will be seen more favorably by the receiver. For example, when a manager tells her boss what she feels her boss wants to hear, she is filtering information. As information is passed up to senior executives, it has to be condensed and synthesized by underlings so those on top don’t become overloaded with information. The personal interests and perceptions of what is important by those doing the synthesizing are going to result in filtering....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page36 / 46

Horizontal communications are often necessary to save time...

This preview shows document pages 36 - 38. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online