101 1 1wwwwordcountorg designer jonathan harris

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10_1 1 1. Designer: Jonathan Harris, Number27.org
10_2 1 1. Designer: Jonathan Harris, Number27.org 10_3 1 1. Designer: Jonathan Harris, Number27.org From: Designer: Jonathan Harris, Number27.org WordCount™ is an artistic experiment in the way we use language. It presents the 86,000 most frequently used English words, ranked in order of commonness. Each word is scaled to reflect its frequency relative to the words that precede and follow it, giving a visual barometer of relevance. The larger the word, the more we use it. The smaller the word, the more uncommon it is. WordCount data currently comes from the British National Corpus®, a 100- million-word collection of samples of written and spoken language from a wide range of sources, designed to provide an accurate cross-section of current English usage. WordCount includes all words that occur at least
twice in the BNC®. In the future, WordCount will be modified to track word usage within any desired text, website, and eventually the entire Internet. Information design, however, does not always have to provide typographic data, but may consist of timelines, charts, outlines and symbols. For example, the New York Times piece “102 Minutes” organized the events of September 11th, 2001 into a minute-by-minute format, supplemented with diagrams of the Twin Towers, showing each floor, and what happened when. Considering the massive amount of information that needed to be organized, this was an effective and accessible design solution. 10_4 1 1. AIGA Design Archives Design Firm/Client: The New York Times Graphic Editors: Steve Duenes, Archie Tso From: AIGA Design Archives Design Firm/Client: The New York Times Graphic Editors: Steve Duenes, Archie Tso
The tower diagrams were used to help tell the stories of as many of the victims and survivors as possible. The stairwells played a key role in determining who survived and who perished, so it was important to present them prominently in color. The time sequence was meant to depict, with great specificity, the progression of smoke and fire through the tower floors (determined from amateur footage), and to locate and quantify such grim details as where people were last seen on the buildings’ facades and how many people jumped. The locations and movements of people were culled from hundreds of interviews with survivors and from people who had spoken by phone with those who did not survive. Structural details and floor layouts came from the towers’ engineers and occupying companies or employees. If the layout of the information and the characteristics of the type help the viewer understand the information, why do certain layouts achieve better information systems than others? The reason has to do with how the brain functions and what information is recognized first by the eye. The more organized information is, the faster the eye can recognize what it is looking at. In addition, the more excess information that is available to the eye, the longer it takes the viewer to find the most critical information. Hick’s law

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