At the same time the park especially at night is thought of as a site where

At the same time the park especially at night is

This preview shows page 37 - 40 out of 141 pages.

At the same time, the park (especially at night) is thought of as a site where male against female violence occurs (Little 2005; Chan and Rigakos 2002; Pain 1997). Public parks are contested zones because they are accessible by numerous social groups who make different use values of the locale. Even Christopher Park in New York, iconic in gay communities, is neither stably queer or heteronormative (Conlon 2004). Instead, it is through contestation that space becomes produced or intelligible as belonging to one or another social group and the conduct associated with them. It is not only ‘private’ and ‘public’ that are constituted through such regulation and surveillance. It is through surveillance that ‘homosexuals’ as so- called sexual deviants become intelligible as governance objects to organizations like the NCC. Examining the textual organization of surveillance practices and the work of surveillance agents (Walby 2005), in this paper I focus on how the NCC as a governance agency mobilizes against and monitors people with diverse sexualities .> Constant observation and the assigning of terms like “trans” by the dominant mainstream erases the lived experience of the victims LeBlanc 10 UNQUEERING TRANSGENDER? A QUEER GEOGRAPHY OF TRANSNORMATIVITY IN TWO ONLINE COMMUNITIES by Fred Joseph LeBlanc Master of Arts in Gender & Women’s Studies Victoria University of Wellington 2010 P27-30 A nita shows the complications of lived experience upon the transgender category and the limits of transgender as an identity. Anita knows she is “gay” and “a man,” but she also knows that everything she does is “like a woman” and is therefore read as transgender. In fact, in his field work at the New York Lesbian and Gay Community Services Center and the surrounding areas, Valentine found many people on whom the transgender category would be placed, but identified as gay men and saw their gender variance as part of their (homo)sexuality – and this was not limited to male-bodied women. Jade, an older female- bodied individual who identifies as a “mother,” “lesbian,” and a “man,” found the word transgender not representative of her experienc e because “the word ‘trans’ was only used in ‘transsexual,’ meaning you were flipping over, changing your organs” (ibid.) Valentine considers that this is not merely a mis- or non-education issue and that some gay-identified people would adopt the transgender label and abandon their gay identity if they were better informed of it. Rather, for many gender-variant people, personal experiences cannot be accounted for so easily by the categories homosexuality or transgender; both sexual and gendered experiences exceed the boundaries of their categories.
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Impacts
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Bare Life Bodies become occupied by the state, subjected to surveillance, ID numbers, passes, and permits. This leads to unthinkable despair and a state of bare life.
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