According to the Greek Historian Herodotus who plays a bit fast and loose with

According to the greek historian herodotus who plays

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According to the Greek Historian Herodotus (who plays a bit fast and loose with the factsin order to tell a good story), it took twenty years and 100,000 workers to build this thing.Why were such resources dedicated to building what is a glorified grave? First, it’s a demonstration of the pharaoh’s power and authority (indeed, the Great Sphinx, which some argue was built around the same time, serves the same purpose, ONLY THE PHARAOH COULD BUILD THIS, etc.).
And only the Ottoman Turks would use the Sphinx’s nose for target practice….Moreover, as I have said, the Egyptians put great emphasis on death and being properly received into the afterlife, and the king and his family thought that these pyramids would satisfy the requirements necessary. The pyramid isn’t just the king’s mummy in a sarcophagus. They are well prepared, furnished and stocked with chairs, boats, weapons, games, dishes, and foods. Why? Well, the Egyptians believed that the human has two bodies (a physical one, and a spiritual one referred to as the ka). If the physical body is properly preserved via mummification, and the tomb is furnished with all the objects of the dead king’s everyday life, then the kawould be able to have its afterlife after the death of the physical body. The pharaoh isn’t the only one with a nice tomb. Many of his family also have pyramids built, and the nobles have the more modest mastaba(rectangular tombs with flat roofs) in which to be buried.Art and writing. Well, Egyptian art? Largely functional in that wall paintings, mural scenes, and statues of kings and gods in temples all serve a spiritual purpose. For
example, the mural scenes and the sculptures you see in tombs had the specific function of aiding the soul in its journey into the afterlife. Writing in Egypt centers around hieroglyphics (priest carvings or sacred writings), which are pictographic in nature. While the original function of hieroglyphs was a religious one, they were later simplified for writing purposes by the larger population, into two different scripts, and made the move from being originally carved on stone to papyrus (Egyptian paper made from reeds). Most Egyptian literature comes to us written on either papyrus or wooden tablets. Despite its long history, ancient Egypt never produced a developed alphabet from hieroglyphs.That being said, let’s step back to the twilight years of the Middle Kingdom. Things were going fine for awhile, but all things must come to an end. Now, this time around, the cause of the end of the Middle Kingdom did not develop from internal problems but instead from external ones. That is to say that they were invaded by a Semitic-speaking people known as the Hyksos. The Hyksos effectively conquer Egypt, and the period that they rule is known as the Second Intermediate Period. They are VERY unpopular with the native Egyptians, but nevertheless have some positive contributions to Egypt during this period. They teach the Egyptians how to use bronze tools and weapons (including heavier swords and better bows), and introduce the use of the horse-drawn war chariot.

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