Might be disabled kept to windward with the

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might be disabled, kept to windward with the Constitution— ready to bear down & support the Whole, at 1/2 past 5 PM the Wind began to blow fresh from the N NE Made the signal for Bombs and Gun Boats to retire out of Gun shot of the Enemy and be taken in tow by their respective Vessels. at 6 PM Argusmade the signal that the strange sail was a friend. in the Action of this day No. 6 Commanded by Lt. Wadsworth had her Latten Yard shot away. No. 4 Capt Decatur a shot in the Hull, No. 8 lost 2 Men killed by a cannon shot, some of the other boats received trifling damage. the Gun Boats fired about 50 Rounds each. the Enemy must have lost many men & the buildings in the city must have received considerable damage from our shot and shells. All the officers & men engaged in Action behaved gallantly, at 3/4 past 6 all the Boats were in tow & the squadron in 35 fathoms Water hard bottom. 1. In a time retrenchment, Jefferson’s involvement in the Tripolitan War seemed to go counter toRepublican desires. What options might Jefferson have pursued short of military action? Why do you think he chose the option that he did —even though it meant a considerable financial commitment? 2. In addition to protecting American commerce in the Mediterranean, what message was the UnitedStates sending to Europe and the world through its action against the Barbary states? 8-6 A Matter of Honor or Vengeance? (1804) In the election of 1804, Vice President Aaron Burr was not only replaced by George Clinton, but he was also refused a position in Jefferson’s second administration. Burr tried to recoup his political fortunes by running for the governorship of New York, but was defeated, largely through the influence of Hamilton who referred to the former vice president as a “dangerous man, and one who ought not to be trusted with the reigns of government.” A few months after this defeat, the men meet on the dueling grounds at Weehawken, New Jersey. Each fired a shot from a .56 caliber dueling pistol. Burr, unharmed, mortally wounded Hamilton who died the next day. Source: William Coleman, ed., A Collection of the Facts and Documents Relative to the Death of MajorGeneral Alexander Hamilton(New York, 1804); Matthew L. Davis, ed., Memoirs of Aaron Burr, with Miscellaneous Selections from His Correspondence, 2 vols. (New York, Harper 1836–1837). 204
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Part Eight: Jefferson and the Republic Aaron Burr to Alexander Hamilton: the first in a series of letters which led to the duel. SIR, I send for your perusal a letter signed Charles D. Cooper, which, though apparently published some time ago, has but very recently come to my knowledge. Mr. Van Ness, who does me the favour to deliver this, will point out to you that clause of the letter to which I particularly request your attention.

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