Understand diversity of interpretations through

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Understand diversity of interpretations through analysis of context, point of view and frames of reference. See global patterns and processes over time and space while also connecting local developments to global ones and moving through levels of generalizations from the global to the particular. Compare within and among societies, including comparing societies’ reactions to global processes. Be aware of human commonalities and differences while assessing claims of universal standards, and understand culturally diverse ideas and values in historical context. At the end of this course, students will understand: Major turning points that shaped the modern world Current world issues and relate them to their historical, political, economic, geographical and cultural contexts The historical roots of significant events, ideas, movements, and phenomena The contributions and patterns of civilizations of the past and societies around the world Historical perspectives as they explore ways societies have dealt with continuity and change, through concepts such as civilization, revolution, government, economics, war, stability, movement, technology, etc. In this course, we will: Create individual presentations on assigned topics Learn through primary sources Use technology for class related activities Take quizzes to check for understanding Work individually and in groups on projects Write essays and develop theses
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
About the AP World History Course AP World History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university world history course. In AP World History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides five themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures. Prerequisites There are no prerequisites for the AP World History course. Students should be able to read a college-level textbook and write grammatically correct, complete sentences. Course Textbook : Stearns, Peter N., Michael Adas, Stuart B. Schwartz, and Marc Jason Gilbert. World Civilizations: The Global Experience . 6th Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2011.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern