Thin provisioning thin provisioning or overbooking

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Thin provisioning Thin provisioning or overbooking allows you to allocate larger storage spaces than the disk space available in the pool. Thin provisioning is based on the premise that not all users will use all of space in their allocated storage space. Space is added to a user's storage space as the user consumes space. If a storage space runs out of disk space, it will immediately unmount, leaving any I/O processes vulnerable to data corruption. o An unmounted storage space must be brought back online manually. o Files can be accessed after the storage space is brought back online manually, but you must add more physical disk space to the pool and add it to the storage space in order to use the storage space. Storage Optimization 0:00-0:21 In this lesson, we're going to talk about how to optimize your storage space. Our goal here is to make the storage devices in our computer systems work as fast as possible because nothing's more annoying than a slow hard disk drive. You can optimize your storage space at both the hardware and the software levels. Let's look at the hardware first. Hardware 0:22-0:34 When it comes to hardware, there are two things that you can do to optimize the performance of your storage system. The first one is to optimize the disk rotational speed and the second one is to optimize the disk interface. Let's talk about disk rotational speed first. Upgrade the Hard Disk 0:35-2:31 The first thing you can do is to upgrade to the fastest hard disk possible. Hard disk drives come in a variety of different rotational speeds. The rotational speed dictates, to a large extent, how fast data can be written to or read from the hard disk drive. Basically, the faster the drive spins, the faster it can read data, and the faster it can write data. The slowest drive that you'll see on the market runs at about 5400 revolutions per minute, or RPMs.So when you're flipping through your Sunday paper, and you come across an ad from your local computer store, and they have an unbelievable deal on a big hard disk drive, a lot of the times, the reason that disk is so inexpensive is because it's running at a very low rotational speed. 5400 RPM sounds like a lot, and if you've ever driven a car, and you have your engine running at 5400 RPMs, it's spinning fast. But in terms of computer hard disk drives, this speed is actually fairly slow. At a bare minimum, I would recommend that you get a 7200 RPM drive. 7200 RPMs is the baseline.You don't want to go much slower than that because you'll end up with a slow computer. Now, obviously, a 7200 RPM drive is going to cost you a little bit more than a 5400 RPM drive, but the increase in performance is usually worth the slight increase in price. Now, if you need a better performance because you'll be doing video editing, or using the hard disk in a server, then you'll want to use a faster hard disk drive.
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