What makes a person Go Feedback systems returning a part of the output signal

What makes a person go feedback systems returning a

This preview shows page 14 - 16 out of 16 pages.

What makes a person Go? Feedback systems: returning a part of the output signal to the control device for pur- poses of “fine tuning” behaviors. Feed - forward systems: control behaviors or processes by providing advance infor- mation instead of feedback. What makes a person Grow? Pribram did not specify developmental stages, but we can assume that biological maturity and growth fine-tune the feedback and feed-forward neural mechanisms, possibly providing a foundation of experiencing one’s self. Is it testable? At higher levels of analysis, the task of demonstrating that the human brain encodes information holographically becomes extraordinarily difficult. The brain as a “wet” supercomputer : numerous cognitive scientists agree with Pri- bram’s perspective that the brain is “wet” (biologically-based) information proces- sor. Is it useful? Pribram’s theory is both practically and heuristically useful. His holographic hypothe- sis is based on neurobiology but he ascends several levels to explain high-order psychological functions. Steven Pinker Computational Theory of the Mind For Pinker the mind is neither intangible nor socially constructed. According to his theory, the mind consists of mental modules supported by multiple layers of bio- chemical machinery, capable of processing memory, thoughts, emotions, desires and other information.
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Although Pinker sees the mind as arising out of biological “machinery”, this machin- ery specially organized to process information. What makes a person Go? For cognitive scientists information, does not function as a motive or an in- stinct. Information is built into the environment much as “wetness: is built into the ocean. Motivation is already built into cognitive science’s foundational assumption: the human mind received, retrieves, stores, transforms and transmits infor- mation. Laboratory research has shown that most people use four major formats for representing and processing information. 1. Visual image: a two-dimensional, picturelike mosaic in the “mind’s eye” 2. Phonological representation: stretches of syllables that enable us to hold four to seven chunks of information in short term memory for three to five seconds. 3. Grammatical representation: hierarchical trees of verbs, phrases, phonemes and syllables that determine how we compose sentences and communicate through language. 4. Mentalese: language of thought What makes a person Grow? Pinker’s views on personality development as well his computational theory of mind both grow out of his evolutionary perspective of adaptation. Pinker believes that 50% of the variation in personality is due to genetic causes, 45% results from other environmental events impinging on the grow- ing brain and only 5% of personality differences among people can be attrib- uted to parental influence. The work of Judith Harris says that children are primarily socialized by the peer group rather than parents. Is it testable?
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