Tefnin suggests that Hatshepsut experimented with a new image suitable for a

Tefnin suggests that hatshepsut experimented with a

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Tefnin suggests that Hatshepsut experimented with a new image suitable for a female Pharaoh. As there are a number of statues which were found in Deir El-Bahri that show Hatshepsut with feminine characteristics but still wearing the full male regalia. There is a limestone statue of her as king wearing male regalia, but without the artificial beard. She also appears to be slim, graceful and has breasts. Tyldesley suggested that this new image maybe be an “asexual mixture of both female and male strengths ”. There is also another statue of her made from red granite where she is shown in full female regalia but a feminine titulary was inscribed on the ureus. At the back of the statue there is an image of Taweret who was the goddess of childbirth. The images of Hatshepsut Hatshepsut, like her contemporaries understood the importance of image. A number of her statues depict her wearing full male pharaonic regalia. This was often misunderstood by early scholars who assumed that Hatshepsut was a ‘cross-dresser’ who wore king’s clothing in order to pass herself off as a male. What is now clear is that there were changes to her royal image over time. In a number of surviving statues as pharaoh, she appears to have experimented with a range of images in which traditional queenly elements give way to a more masculine, pharaonic depiction. It is now generally agreed that the French scholar Roland Tefnin was correct in his analysis of Hatshepsut’s statues, suggesting that they represent a gradual change from female to male features. Although the statues cannot be reliably dated, his theory makes good sense in light of other evidence of the early years of her reign. Foreign policy Military campaigns It was once believed that there were no militaristic campaigns during Hatshepsut’s reign. These views were based on the lack of monumental reliefs of Hatshepsut in a militaristic character and the belief that Hatshepsut would be less aggressive than a man and incapable of leading an army. Although, many of Hatshepsut’s monuments were destroyed after her death, and these may have contained evidence of military campaigns. Despite the lack of official records, there is no reason to suppose that there was any deliberate intention on the part of Hatshepsut to adopt a non- aggressive policy and there ‘is nothing in Hatshepsut’s character to suggest that she would be frightened of taking the military initiative as and when necessary’ . Of the evidence that has been discovered for military campaigns during Hatshepsut’s reign includes that of a graffito written by Tiy, one of Hatshepsut’s chief officials and found on the island of Sehel. This is the chief source of evidence for a campaign in Nubia, and suggested that Hatshepsut led the campaign by herself, and he personally witnessed this.
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