What did it feel like when you had trouble finding

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Developing Helping Skills: A Step-by-Step Approach to Competency
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 1
Developing Helping Skills: A Step-by-Step Approach to Competency
Chang/Decker/Scott
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What did it feel like when you had trouble finding common ground? (Typically, people report beginning to feel some discomfort and anxiety when they have spent several minutes trying and haven’t discovered anything in common yet. Discuss the strategies they can use to help explain and defuse these feelings.)
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Developing Helping Skills: A Step-by-Step Approach to Competency
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 1
Developing Helping Skills: A Step-by-Step Approach to Competency
Chang/Decker/Scott
Expert Verified
DEFINITIONS: Race, Ethnicity, Culture, Cultural Diversity, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Competence Slide 5 Time: 15 minutes Facilitator Instructions: The name of this course is Child Welfare Practice in a Multi-Cultural Environment. Before we continue talking about culture, let's define the words we'll use today. This can be done as a discussion and brainstorming activity in which participants share their understanding of the terms, or to save time, the trainer may simply provide the definitions below. Some of these terms will be review from Framework for Child Welfare Practice in California . Race: A race is a biological subspecies or variety of a species, consisting of a more or less distinct population with anatomical traits that distinguish it clearly from other races. But this biologist's definition does not fit the reality of human genetic variation today. We are an extremely homogenous species, biologically. As a matter of fact, all humans today are 99.9% genetically identical, and most of the variation that does occur is in the difference between males and females and our unique personal traits. Even our closest relatives, the chimpanzees have 2-3 times more genetic variation than people. Orangutans have 8-10 times more variation. It is now clear that our human "races" are primarily social creations, not biological realities. The commonly held belief in the existence of human biological races is based on the assumption that anatomical traits, such as skin color and specific facial characteristics, cluster

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