133 conditions for giving an incomplete when

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13.3. Conditions for giving an incomplete. When requesting an incomplete, the student must: have a passing grade (C - or above) up to that point in the class. have completed at least 2/3 of the course work up to that point. present a formal document regarding the nature of emergency or the medical problem. 13.4. Invalid reasons for requesting an incomplete. Falling behind in this course or a heavy work load in other courses are not acceptable reasons for requesting an incomplete. If you miss a midterm (for whatever reasons), you will not qualify for an incomplete, as your grade before the final exam will include a 0 on that midterm, which will not have been “resurrected” by the final at the time of requesting the incomplete grade. 14. Academic Integrity The Mathematics Department, and in particular, the instructor and the GSIs in this course, expect that students in mathematics courses will not engage in cheating or plagiarism. Due to the online format of this course, Specific Honor Code and Exam Instructions for the exams and quizzes for this course will be provided in due time. The following is adapted from the Math Department web page to our course. Read it for general understanding of cheating and honor code and adapt it to the present online circumstances by following the Specific Honor Code and Exam Instructions that will be provided by the instructor. 14.1. What does cheating mean? Broadly speaking, cheating means violating the policies of a course or of the university in order to gain an unfair advantage over fellow students. A particular kind of cheating is plagiarism, which means taking credit for someone else’s work. Cheating and plagiarism hurt your fellow students in the short term, they hurt the cheater in the long term, and they will not be tolerated. On exams, the most basic type of cheating is copying off of someone else’s paper. Graders easily spot when two exam papers look unusually similar, or have similar (wrong or correct) answers, calculations, ideas, or thought structure, even if written in different words or order of words. Even glancing at someone else’s paper to check your answer is cheating. If you write the correct answer to a computational problem without any justification or with a bogus justification leading to that answer, this raises strong suspicions that you cheated, on top of not receiving any credit anyways due to the lack of correct justification. 6
14.2. Electronic devices on exams/quizzes. Electronic devices such as phones, calculators (electronic, mechanical, or any other type), and other devices are also not allowed on exams/quizzes not even to tell the time. There are too many ways to cheat using software and the Internet. Exams are not intended to test your ability to find the answer by any means necessary. The questions might be too easy for that! Rather, exams/quizzes are supposed to test your understanding of the course material, which you will need in order to use math correctly in subsequent courses and in the real world.

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