What are some of the key propositions of the theory

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What are some of the key propositions of the theory? How and why do people develop problems? Enter text here. Theory of Change How can therapy help a person overcome problems? What must a person do to improve his or her functioning? Enter text here. Interventions What techniques does the counselor use to help bring about change? Enter text here. Who Is in Charge? What Is the Role of the Client and the Counselor? What is the counselor responsible for in sessions? What is the client expected to do? Who takes the leading role in the interaction? Enter text here. Web Resources Who uses this theory? How do they present themselves to the wider community? Where are resources for learning more? Enter text here. Scholarly Articles, Books, and Resources on the Theory What are some good references that I may want to refer to in the future? Enter text here.
Solution-Focused Therapy
Key Concepts What are some of the key propositions of the theory? How and why do people develop problems? Solution-Focused Brief Therapy ( SFBT) concentrates on finding solutions in the present time and exploring one’s hope for the future to find quicker resolution of one’s problems. This method takes the approach that you know what you need to do to improve your own life and, with the appropriate coaching and questioning, are capable of finding the best solutions. Theory of Change How can therapy help a person overcome problems? What must a person do to improve his or her functioning? One of the original beliefs of SFBT therapists was that the solution to a problem is found in the “exceptions,” or those times when one is free of the problem or taking steps to manage the problem. Working from the theory that all individuals are at least somewhat motivated to find solutions, SFBT begins with what the individual is currently doing to initiate behavioral and lifestyle changes. Interventions What techniques does the counselor use to help bring about change? Goal-setting is at the foundation of SFBT; one of the first steps is to identify and clarify your goals. The therapist will begin by questioning what you hope to get out of working with the therapist and how, specifically, your life would change when steps were taken to resolve problems. By answering these types of questions, you can begin to identify solutions and come up with a plan for change. Who Is in Charge? What Is the Role of the Client and the Counselor? What is the counselor responsible for in sessions? What is the client expected to do? Who takes the leading role in the interaction? The therapist uses interventions such as specific questioning techniques, 0-10 scales, empathy and compliments that help a person to recognize one’s own virtues, like courage and strength, that have recently gotten the person through hard times and are likely to work well in the future. Individuals learn to focus on what they can do, rather than what they can’t, which allows them to find solutions and make positive changes more quickly

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