Differences in non verbal communication display rules

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Differences in non-verbal communication Display rules – determine which emotions are acceptable to express in situations e.g. crying at funeral, verbal arguments with family members Rules governing which emotions can or can’t be expressed in public Cultural expressions of emotions are learned through modelling, reinforcement and punishment (we learn to express and interpret emotions differently) Factors influencing interpretations of emotion
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Emotional Intelligence (Daniel Goleman) “Anyone can become angry – that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way – that is not easy” (Aristotle) Emotional Intelligence Skills 1) Empathy – not feeling sorry for others but rather understanding what they are experiencing 2) Self-control – ability to control your emotions, behaviour and desires 3) Self-awareness – awareness of our personality, behaviour, emotions, motivations and thought processes 4) Sensitivity to the feelings of others 5) Persistence – keeping on going even when the situation is difficult 6) Self-motivation – doing things for yourself and not relying on other people or things to motivate you
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Emotional Intelligence (Daniel Goleman) Emotional Intelligence (EQ) – the ability to manage our emotions in an intelligent way Using and expressing our emotions wisely and appropriately Combination of skills that we can use to approach life EQ may explain why some people are more successful than others even if they have the intellectual abilities, schooling and opportunities Good EQ can lead to doing well in life, relationships and work. Good EQ improves our health and overall well-being Good EQ helps us to think more effectively We can learn these skills thus our genetic temperament doesn’t only determine our behaviour
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Emotional Intelligence (Daniel Goleman) Low EQ can lead to health problems, depression, anxiety, eating disorders, drug abuse, aggression, violence, unstable relationships, poor performance at work, ineffective thinking Need to teach young people EQ skills People with these skills can motivate themselves, keep on trying in the face of frustrations, control their impulses, delay gratification, regulate their moods, don’t let their emotions interfere with their ability to think, recognise emotions in others and experience hope. People without these skills may engage in destructive behaviours, lying, cheating, arguing, demanding attention, being stubborn and moody, reacting with anger
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