Analysis this dialogue explores the meaning of piety

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ANALYSIS This dialogue explores the meaning of Piety. As the dialogue starts, Socrates is on his way to court to defend himself against accusations of impious behavior; Euthyphro is prosecuting his own father based on his own understanding in the matter of piety. As the dialogue develops, Euthyphro seems to take on the role of Meletus, Socrates accuser. He claims to have perfect understanding in the matter of piety, so Socrates requests his help to answer Meletus charges against him. He asks Euthyphro to instruct him about the nature of piety. In his first definition, Euthyphro states that he is justified on bringing charges against his father because Zeus has done the same, and therefore there is divine justification. Later, Euthyphro offers other definitions about the nature of piety, and in all of them he implies that his knowledge in the subject is indeed superior to the majority. If this is the case, then only Euthyphro is the judge as to whether an action should or should not be performed. He starts by justifying his actions through divine understanding, but Socrates is not satisfied. He then tries to make his actions right, but, again, Socrates leads him into contractions. Finally, he tries to turn his actions
into a duty. Through the dialogue, Euthyphro tries to use the gods to justify his actions and interests, which is exactly the same charge that will later send Socrates to his death. When asked about the relationship between the gods and human beings, Euthyphro tells us that our duty is to please the gods and, through our actions, to honor and glorify them. If this is true, then we are nothing more than servants of the gods, crated solely to take them higher and higher. I hope our mission is somewhat more substantial than this. The dialogue does not offer an answer to the question of whether something is pious because is loved by the gods, or something is loved by the gods because is pious. Even if we were to assume that the gods love that which is pious, then love is only a consequence of a pious act. They both agree that piety implies justice, but justice does not imply piety. Thus, we can understand justice without bringing in the matter of the gods, which seems to be the biggest problem in this dialogue. If we were to tie justice with the divine, this would imply that reason alone would not be enough to define justice, but we would need divine guidance to do so. Through this dialogue, Euthyphro gets angry and frustrated; while Socrates tone is ironic and condescending. Euthyphro accuses Socrates of creating moving arguments, but Socrates shows Euthyphro that his argument not only moves around, but comes full circle to the starting point. The dialogue shows us that if we are committed to the pursuit of knowledge and truth, we must understand that this may be a never ending process while we are in this life. Although our actions are based on our limited knowledge, justice should always be an integral part of everything we do.

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