Storage spaces are logical drives that display in

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Storage spaces are logical drives that display in File Explorer for storing data and other user files. Storage spaces are created by pooling space from multiple disk drives, or other storage devices, and then creating logical drives from the pooled space. A storage space appears to the user as one drive regardless of the number of disks or devices contributing space to the storage pool. The storage spaces feature is only available in Windows 8.x and 10; it is not included in Windows 7. Storage spaces are comprised of three components: Devices are the hard disks or other types of storage from which storage pools are created. You can use a variety of devices such as SATA drives and external drives to create storage pools. Pools of storage are created from the available disk space. A pool is a logical concept composed of the free space available on the specified storage devices. Storage spaces define logical units of space created from a pool. One or more storage spaces can be created from the pool. To the Windows system and the user, storage spaces appear as disks with typical drive letters (e.g., E: drive, F: drive). The benefits of using storage spaces are: Benefit Description Ease of adding space Storage spaces eliminate the need for such tasks as repartitioning drives, resizing volumes, and backing up data in order to repartition. When you need more disk space for your storage spaces, follow these steps: Install a new storage device to the system. Add the free space on that device to a storage pool. Allocate space to an existing storage space. Data resiliency Storage spaces can include data resiliency. Choosing an option that provides resiliency requires you to allocate space for redundant information. The options for storage spaces data resiliency include: Simple , which does not provide redundancy. This option simply adds space from the storage pool to the storage space. When you select the Simple option, all of the data in the storage space is lost if one of the drives fails. Two-way mirror requires at least two storage devices. The data is written to two devices. Two-way mirror requires twice as much device space as the amount of storage allocated to the storage space. This option protects you from a single storage device failure. Three-way mirror requires at least five storage devices. The data is written to three storage devices. This option provides redundancy for the data if two storage devices fail at one time. Parity requires that you have at least three storage devices. This option uses parity information to reconstruct data if one of the storage devices fails. Parity uses less space for redundancy than the mirror options, but performance is not as good as the mirror options if a device failure occurs. Parity requires only
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50 percent more redundancy space than storage space.
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