ArkNavReport_TOC_Acronyms_ExecSummary.doc

That the existing 9 ft channel would be maintained

Info icon This preview shows pages 23–25. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
that the existing 9-ft channel would be maintained throughout the period of analysis using dredging techniques and disposal areas described in the 1974 Operations and Maintenance Plan (O&M plan) for which an EIS was prepared and a ROD signed. Subsequent to, and in accordance with the 1974 O&M plan, in-river disposal of dredge materials has been used in Arkansas with the exception of the White River Entrance Channel, where terrestrial sites are utilized. Terrestrial disposal sites have also been acquired for use as needed in Oklahoma. These designated sites are sufficient to xxiii
Image of page 23

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
contain the dredge material projected to be required through the 50-year period of analysis used in 1974. However, projections indicate that the currently used terrestrial sites in Oklahoma would not be adequate to meet disposal area needs through the 50-year period of analysis for the present study, i.e., 2010 through 2060. Additional currently unused disposal areas in Oklahoma that were approved in the 1974 O&M plan, would be needed to meet the projected dredge material disposal needs to maintain a 9-ft channel through 2060. Natural succession of habitats in these unused disposal sites has occurred for approximately three decades. These areas are now covered by substantial tracts of mature floodplain forests that are essential components to the region’s complex mosaic of riparian, wetland, and floodplain habitats. Use of the previously approved sites would require additional NEPA documentation and additional coordination with Federal and state fish and wildlife management agencies because of the significant changes in the habitats of the dredge material disposal sites. Given the increased emphasis on the importance of high quality floodplain habitats since 1974, it is reasonable to assume that substantial mitigation would be necessary. In addition, under provisions of the Clean Water Act, the Oklahoma portion of the MKARNS has been designated an impaired stream. As a designated impaired stream, in-river dredge material disposal in the Oklahoma reach has been closely regulated by the State of Oklahoma, and rarely, if ever, allowed to occur. Alternative A assumes that the impaired stream designation is not likely to be changed in the immediate future, and also assumes that in-river dredge material disposal in the Oklahoma reach of the MKARNS would not be allowed by the State of Oklahoma. This alternative also assumes that disposal of dredge material on the Arkansas portion of the MKARNS would continue in accordance with the 1974 O&M plan. Alternative A presents a projection of future conditions that accounts for and considers uncertainties about future changes in operation and maintenance of the navigation system, without the measures considered in the “with action alternatives” (Alternatives C, D and E). This scenario, although conservative, provides a reasonable perspective that accentuates the significance of adverse effects to the natural environment. Since no significant changes to the current approved 1974 O&M plan are proposed, Alternative A is titled and considered the “no action alternative.”
Image of page 24
Image of page 25
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern