Most women stay in these abusive relationships either

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- Most women stay in these abusive relationships either because they don’t speak English, have no money, have no friends in the United States, or don’t know they can leave abusive husbands without being deported. 37. What makes up a traditional date (pg. 213) - Males and females follow clear, culturally defined gender role scripts, at least among the middle classes. It is still a way to meet potential spouses. - Both men and women expect the men to take control, including initiating the date, deciding where to go, picking up the woman, paying for the date, and taking her home. - Expectation is usually unstated but both members of both sexes often assume that the woman will show gratitude in some way- usually through a goodnight kiss, making out, or intercourse. 38. Speed dating (pg. 218) - Singles attend an event such as at a local restaurant, where they engage in a series of brief face-to-face interaction with 14 or more potential romantic partners. The participants go from one table to another and spend 10 minutes catting with each person.
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- After they “grade” one another and decide whether they’d be willing to get together with that person in the future. 39. Filter theory (the processes or stages) (pg. 220) - The theory that states we sift eligible people according to specific criteria and thus reduce the pool of potential partners to a small number of candidates. The stages of the filter theory are: 1. Propinquity (geographic closeness) 2. Physical appearance 3. Ethnicity and race 4. Social class 5. Religion 6. Age 7. Values and Personality - It is essentially how we narrow our pool of eligible partners. - However, an increasing number of people are expanding their marriage markets through heterogamy. 40. Propinquity (pg. 220) - Geographic closeness 41. Halo effect (pg. 221) - Physically attractive people benefit from this. - They are assumed to possess other desirable social characteristics such as warmth, sexual responsiveness, kindness, poise, sociability, and good character. - They are also seen as having more prestige, happier marriages, greater social and professional success, and more fulfilling lives. - In fact, life satisfaction is much the same for both attractive and unattractive people. 42. Hypergamy (pg. 224) - Marrying up to a higher social class - Ex. Kate Middleton’s marriage to Prince William (can be seen as both hypergamy and hypogamy (marrying down in social class) dependent on which side you look at it.) 43. Social exchange theory in reference to mating and dating (Give and Take) (pg. 226) - People will begin and remain in a relationship if the rewards are higher than the costs. - Rewards may be; intrinsic characteristics (intelligence, sense of humor), behaviors (sex, companionship), or access to desired resources (money, power). - Costs , the price paid may be unpleasant or destructive behavior(insults, violence), or loses (a lower social class, time invested in a relationship) 44. Manifest functions of dating (obvious, clear, apparent) (pg. 211) - Maturation
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- Fun and recreation - Companionship - Love and affection - Mate selection 45. Latent function of dating (hidden, concealed, underlying) (pg. 212) - Socialization - Social status - Fulfillment - Sexual experimentation - Big business
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  • Spring '08
  • PLUNKETT
  • partner, Sexual intercourse, Human sexual behavior

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