These modulations of successive ascending 3rds take

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These modulations of successive ascending 3rds take on a compelling sense of inevitability, attributable in part to the steady
nature of the tonal ascent. Let’s look more closely at some of these details.2Now let’s listen again to the entire piece, while following the score.Johannes BrahmsJohannes Brahms in 1 853 1Johannes Brahms (1 833-1 897) was born and raised in the working-class neighborhoods of Hamburg, Germany. His father was a modestly successful musician, and his parents recognized their son’s musical talents and did their best to cultivate them.Private piano lessons supplemented Brahms’ education, and by age
ten he participated in his first public performance. While still a teenager, he developed into a very fine pianist. In early 1 853, he undertook a concert tour with the Hungarian violinist and composer, Ede Remenyi. It was during that tour he met another great violinist, Joseph Joachim, who would remain a lifelong friend.In September 1 853, Brahms introduced himself to Robert Schumann, and became acquainted with the entire Schumann household. Schumann, for his part, was thoroughly taken with the young man and his music. He enthusiastically endorsed Brahms’ music in an article published in Neue Zeitschrift fur Musik, and followed up with letters of recommendation that preceded Brahms in his travels to Leipzig to seek publication of his music.In October 1 853, while at the Schumann home, Brahms took part in a “collaborative” composition with Robert Schumann and a lesser known composer, Albert Dietrich. Brahms contributed the scherzo to a violin sonata the three put together in honor of their mutual friend, Hungarian violinist Joseph Joachim, which came to be known as the F. A. E.Sonata.F.A.E. Sonata: ScherzoThe F. A. E.Sonata is a violin sonata. The initials “F. A.E.” derive from Joseph Joachim’s motto, “Frei aber Einsam,” which can be translated, “Free, but alone.” Let’s learn more about the history of the F. A. E.Sonata and Brahms’ contribution to it from Professor James Lyon.1And now let’s enjoy Brahms’ Scherzo from the F. A. E.Sonata, performed by Professor James Lyon, violin, and Professor Sue Haug, piano.
Brahms Op. 118, RomanzeBrahms’ career as a composer was launched with Schumann’s assistance in the fall of 1 853, and Brahms was indebted to him. So, less than half a year later when Schumann attempted suicide and had himself committed to a sanatorium in Endenich, Brahms returned to Dusseldorf to help Clara Schumann.Clara Wieck Schumann (1 819-1 896) was the daughter of Friedrich Wieck, Robert Schumann’s piano teacher in Leipzig. She was a child prodigy who became one of the great concert pianists of the nineteenth century. Brahms’ return to the Schumannhousehold allowed Clara to resume her performance career, while Brahms looked after the children, organized her husband’s music library, and took care of his business dealings.

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