Lecture6-SensoryShortTermWorkingMemory-3.pptx

Partial report procedure participants report items

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items as they can from the entire array. Partial-Report Procedure: Participants report items only from the line of the array to which they are subsequently cued (e.g., by a tone of different frequency). 21
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P B N O D M Y T A F G J 23
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Delay of tone (seconds) 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1 2 3 4 Mean Number of Items Recalled Results of Sperling Partial-Report Study Results demonstrate that the entire sensory array available to viewers briefly, but fades from view is about 1 sec. 25
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X M R J C N K P V F L B 27
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28
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Delay of tone (seconds) 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1 2 3 4 Mean Number of Lines Recalled Results of Sperling Partial-Report Study black letters on white background white letters on black background 29
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Attention Rehearsal Sensory store Short-term memory Long-term memory maintenance rehearsal elaborative rehearsal Model of Short-Term Memory 30
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Attention Rehearsal Sensory store Short-term memory Long-term memory maintenance rehearsal elaborative rehearsal Model of Short-Term Memory 31
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Attention Rehearsal Sensory store Short-term memory Long-term memory maintenance rehearsal elaborative rehearsal Model of Short-Term Memory 32
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Attention Rehearsal Sensory store Short-term memory Long-term memory maintenance rehearsal elaborative rehearsal Model of Short-Term Memory 33
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How do we “forget” information from short-term memory? (1) the passage of time (decay of memory) (2) other information interferes with the information we are trying to recall 34
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Brown & Peterson’s Decay Theory of Memory 6 2 9 4 1 8 3 8 5 7 1 8 2 6 3 9 List of digits presented one digit per second PROBE Probe Digit Task item to be recalled 35
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Brown & Peterson’s Decay Theory of Memory Recall Interval (seconds) Recall Accuracy 100% 0% 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 36
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Brown & Peterson’s results indicated that we have a constant (and very rapid) rate of decay from short-term memory, such that we recall practically nothing after about 18-20 seconds after stimulus presentation. However, matters were a bit more complicated than that… 37
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Evidence Against Decay Theory of Memory Probe Digit Task (with digits presented at different rates) 6 2 9 4 1 8 3 8 5 7 1 8 2 6 3 9 6394183857182639 1 digit per second: 4 digits per second: 16 seconds 4 seconds 38
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Evidence Against Decay Theory of Memory 6 2 9 4 1 8 3 8 5 7 1 8 2 6 3 9 6394183857182639 1 digit per second: 4 digits per second: 16 seconds 4 seconds Decay theory would predict that
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