Step by step 1 prompt the user for the amount of

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erring on the side of finding too many classes/objects. Step by Step 1. Prompt the user for the amount of purchase. Must be less than 50.00 2. Read the amount of purchase and store it in a double or float. You can't just read from the keyboard any old way in Java like you can in C, for instance. Try adding this library to your sketch as demonstrated here: 3. Prompt the user for the amount he or she is paying. Probably just static text in the box above. 4. The amount paid must be less than 50.00 and greater than or equal to the amount of purchase. 5. Perform the change-making algorithm (or your own variation of it) as described under Getting Started above. 6. Output the number of each denomination you're issuing in change. In our example, you might print something like: “0 twenties”, “0 tens”, “0 fives”, “4 ones”, “2 quarters”, “1 dime”, “0 nickels” and “3 pennies”. This would show up in the text area at the bottom of the Processing window. Of course, you can probably think of a cooler graphic way to do this... Hints and Tips The best way to keep track of the value of each bill or coin denomination to facilitate a simple while loop is to initialize an array, say billsAndCoins[] with values of 20, 10, 5, 1, .25, .1, .05 and .01. Then within your loop you can determine the face value of the coin or bill you are considering giving out in change by
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referring to the current element of billsAndCoins . And the currentElement is just a counter you increment each time you go around the loop. Arrays and other collection classes are covered in the text and in the links that follow Learning Objective L4,. Several other projects will use them as well.
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  • Spring '08
  • GeraldReed
  • $5, Meyer, $5.13

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