How did Congress restrict immigration The Emergency Quota Act of 1921 limited

How did congress restrict immigration the emergency

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1.How did Congress restrict immigration?The Emergency Quota Act of 1921 limited immigrants from Europe to only 3% ofthe total number of immigrants from each country in 1910. This reduced thenumber of immigrants entering the countryThe Immigration Act of 1924 reduced the number of immigrants allowed to only2% of the number in 1890.The Japanese were banished hands down and NONE were admitted.Therefore In 1931 more Americans LEFT American than entered America (this was thefirst time in our history.)2.How did the Great Depression happen?Great Depression began after the stock market ran down of October 1929, whichprompted Wall Street into a panic and wiped out millions of investors. Over the nextcouple of years, consumer spending and investment went down, causing steep declines inindustrial output and employment as failing companies fired workers.
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USA HISTORY 8Great Depression reached its lowest point in 1933.By this time, 15 million Americanswere unemployed and nearly half the country’s banks had failed when the some 3.What was the Bonus Army?Bonus Armywas a common name for an assemblage of some 43,000 marchers 17,000U.S. World War I veterans, their families, and affiliated groups who assembled inWashington, D.C. in the 1932 summer to demonstrate cash-payment redemption of theirservice certificates4.How did FDR win the election?In 1944, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt is elected to an unprecedented fourth termin office5.How was FDR’s plan fitting in to the established condition (control by the wealthy) ratherthan giving the power back to the people (according to Zinn)?Franklin Delano Roosevelt presided over two of the biggest crises in U.S. history: theGreat Depression of the 1930s and World War II. 6.How did the New Deal contribute to the rise of the African American Civil Rightsmovement?The shift in attitude, as Havard Sitkoff, the prominent historian of the African Americaninvolvement in the New Deal watches, impelled the issue of race relations onto thenational stage and introduce a new political atmosphere in which "Afro-Americans andtheir partners could start to strugglewith some desire of progress. It made it clear that thecentral government had an obligation to guarantee thecivil rights of all Americans wereensured; rendered social liberties a center piece of the liberal plan; and roused an era ofAfrican American leaders to keep on pressuring the national government, as well as thefederal courts, to strike down the laws that supported the across the board racialunfairness that African Americans had persisted since the guarantee of reconstruction.Chapter 16: A People’s War
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