If the sentence has an auxiliary verb thesubject is

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. If the sentence has an auxiliary verb, the subject is placed after the auxiliary and the main verb. For example: a) A unicorn will come into the room. b) Into the room will come a unicorn . Since this type of inversion generally places the focus on the subject, the subject is likely to be a full noun or noun phrase rather than a pronoun. Third-person personal pronouns are especially unlikely to be found as the subject in this construction. For example: a) Down the stairs came the dog . – Noun subject b) ? Down the stairs came it . – Third-person personal pronoun as subject; unlikely unless it has special significance and is stressed c) Down the stairs came I . – First-person personal pronoun as subject; more likely, though still I would require stress
207 A [wikid] GLOSSARY OF SYNTAX MODIFIER modifier is an optional element in phrase structure or clause structure. A modifi er is so called because it is said to modify (change the meaning of) another element in the structure, on which it is dependent. Typically the modifier can be removed without affecting the grammar of the sentence. For example, in the English sentence Th is is a red ball , the adjective red is a modifier, modifying the noun ball . Removal of the modifier would leave Th is is a ball , which is grammatically correct and equivalent in structure to the original sentence. Other terms used with a similar meaning are qualifier (the word qualify may be used in the same way as modify in this context), attribute , and adjunct. These concepts are often distinguished from complements and arguments , which may also be considered dependent on another element, but are considered an indispensable part of the structure. For example, in His face became red , the word red might be called a complement or argument of became , rather than a modifier or adjunct, since it cannot be omitted from the sentence. Modifiers may come either before or after the modified element (the head ), depending on the type of modifier and the rules of syntax for the language in question. A modifier placed before the head is called a  premodifier ; one placed after the head is called a  postmodifier . For example, in land mines , the word land is a premodifier of mines , whereas in the phrase mines in wartime , the phrase in wartime is a postmodifier of mines . A head may have a number of modifiers, and these may include both premodifiers and postmodifiers. For example: that nice tall man from Canada whom you met In this noun phrase, man is the head, nice and tall are premodifiers, and from Canada and whom you met are postmodifiers. Notice that in English, simple adjectives are usually used as premodifiers, with occasional exceptions such as galore (which always appears after the noun) and the phrases time immemo- rial and court martial (the latter comes from French, where most adjectives are postmodifiers). Sometimes placement of the adjective aft er the noun entails a change of meaning: compare a re- sponsible person and the person responsible , or the proper town (the appropriate town) and the town proper

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