If eddie chooses the law over justice in turning

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Eddie. If Eddie chooses the law over justice in turning Marco and Rodolpho in, Marco chooses his own form of justice over the law in killing Eddie. the law does not necessarily cover all issues of right and wrong adequately. Not all that is legal is right, and not all that is illegal is always wrong. But at the same time, the play cautions against taking justice into one’s own hands, which both Marco’s and Eddie’s actions reveal to be a dangerous, not to mention ineffective course of action. What they see as noble and honorable course of action (preventing marriage, avenging family dishonor) is in fact not within the law, but with justice. The law therefore goes against their traditional codes of honor. Maturity and Independence Over the course of the play, Catherine grows, matures, and attempts to achieve out her own independent life, while Eddie struggles to keep her under his control—and his roof. Catherine gradually matures, as she finds a job and begins to assert herself with the help of Beatrice , who tells her not to act like a child anymore. Eddie misjudges Catherine’s
maturity and continues to see her as a young girl; because of this, he denies her independence. Eddie is sad to see Catherine grow up, and tries to hold onto her as she matures and becomes more independent. But even late in the play, it is questionable to what degree Catherine really achieves independence. Given the play’s setting in the 1950s, in a traditional Italian immigrant community, it would be difficult for a woman to achieve absolute independence. Catherine never completely achieves independence. Once she has fought against Eddie’s ideas over her although she still cares about Eddie’s thoughts, she gets in a relationship with Rodolpho who also controls her and dominate her. Thus, even if Catherine still depends on others and her actions are partially dictated or influenced by others, this should not negate the fact of the big growth and maturation in her character, as she gradually becomes more of her own person, and learns to assert herself against the controlling, oppressive figure of Eddie. Manliness Eddie has a very narrow view of what it means to be a man. He believes he is a real man ; he works hard to support his family and protects his territory and possessions . To Eddie, his possessions include Beatrice and Catherine and this is partly why he is so protective of Catherine. Eddie is suspicious of Rodolfo because he has “unmanly” interests: cooking, singing, sewing and dancing. He believes he is unnatural and hints that he thinks he is homosexual, something which was regarded as a crime at the time. However, Eddie’s own manliness is questioned when Beatrice confronts him about the fact that they have not slept together for a long time. Later in the play Eddie warns Beatrice never to question his manhood in this way. Power Throughout the play there is a clear power struggle between the men . Eddie in the beginning is the dominant male in the house; he is respected and appreciated by Beatrice and Catherine. When Marco and Rodolfo enter his territory, his home, he immediately feels threatened . Catherine has previously idolized him and yet now she has a new interest - an exciting and good-looking young man, Rodolfo.

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