The senate judiciary committee has evolved into a

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The Senate Judiciary Committee has evolved into a dangerous institution, which resembles more of a hurdle to confirmation than it was ever intended to be. Starting as just another committee in Congress, the Judiciary Committee now thoroughly attacks all Supreme Court nominees. Controversy of the current sort was almost nonexistent prior to 1930. The Committee‘s mission , now, is to find some sort of damaging record about every nominee. Interest groups help the Committee accomplish this task. Broadcasting confirmation hearings only encourage the already bloodthirsty senators to dig deeper into the backgrounds of nominees in an effort to create even more drama. The media coverage that current hearings receive helps senators win reelections 40 but damages the respect that the public has for both the nominee and the Court as an institution. The public is as unforgiving as senators are. Today, citizens are very unwilling to accept that people with less than perfect personal records still make acceptable, or even admirable, public officials. So much has changed so quickly. Just one hundred years ago, in 1910 when Horace Lurton became an associate justice, Northern senators voted for his confirmation despite him being from a Southern slave state (Tennessee). Now, 40 Because the more visible a senator is, the more likely his reelection will be. In other words, senators try to get as much media coverage as they can because the more familiar their constituents are with them, the more likely individual constituents are to vote for the senator name recognition matters (Herrnson).
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76 senators and the public alike not only refuse to overlook an imperfect record, but they also make it a point to seek out as many flaws as possible with each nominee. Fixing the somewhat broken confirmation process should not result in presidents choosing ―stealth‖ nominees over more qualified, more contentio us nominees. Instead, the Senate‘s role in confirmations should be quelled. The Founders gave the Senate ―advice and consent‖ power over confirmation. They did not, however, intend the current circus that is a Senate confirmation hearing. Senators are perfectly capable of deciding a nominee‘s potential as a Supreme Court justice without the testimony of agenda-driven interest groups. Interest groups do not have the best interest of the Court in mind when they testify. Instead, they are fighting against the decisions a nominee may make in certain issue-specific future cases. Additionally, if the power of the Senate Judiciary Committee was reigned in, presidents would have more freedom to nominate the most qualified candidate, instead of searching for the most obscure, barely qualified person available. Hearings do not need to be televised, either; confirmation hearings only breed unnecessary drama. Frankly, when void of controversy, the public does not watch the hearings anyway. If the opportunity to create a sound bite is taken away from senators on the Senate Judiciary Committee, they will focus more on their job of
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