Millers Rosie was followed by Norman Rockwells in the Memorial Day issue of The

Millers rosie was followed by norman rockwells in the

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snowballed into effect. Miller’s “Rosie” was followed by Norman Rockwell’s in the Memorial Day issue of The Saturday Evening Post from 1943 (Harvey). Rockwell’s representation is somewhat different from both Miller’s Rosie and the modern one modeled after her. She is filled with more pronounced contradictions between what is masculine and feminine in order to encourage women to work hard for the war effort., while simultaneously encouraging them to remain feminine for their post-war homemaking salvation. She is masculine; her frame is large and burly. Her arms are large and strong and she holds a riveting gun that is slung across her lap, she is dirty and wearing men’s clothes while stepping on a copy of Hitler’s Mein Kampf . Most significantly, however, she is not portrayed in the middle of her hard work. She is depicted eating her lunch, in a passive “womanly” way (Loughery). Rosie’s make-up, not only in Rockwell’s representation but Miller’s as well, is worth noting. Advertising make-up as a commodity that was “essential for women’s well-being” was a tactic used to keep women thinking about their femininity and domesticity despite the new manly shoes they were filling (Delano). Curiously, despite the fact that make-up was often made from petroleum based chemicals and dyes, it was never added to the list of rationed items. Make-up became publicly associated with women’s power-their own personal “was paint”. In her essay “Making up for War: Sexuality and Citizenship in Wartime-Culture,” Page Dougherty Delano illustrates the hold make-up had on American women as a result of
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ROSIE THE RIVETER, SEX SYMBOL OR AMERICAN ICON 5 advertising when she writes, “Make-up helped inscribe what Elizabeth Arden advertised as a ‘war face’ for American women on the home front was well as in the theaters of battle…hardly any American text, poster, advertisement, of film of the era depicts a woman without including her make-up-or connoting a meaningful absence” (Deland). Women were promised washrooms in advertisements, and “Ads and brochures went out of their way to assure women that war work, particularly work in factories and would not infringe on their femininity” (Tobias).
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  • Fall '11
  • speech
  • World War II, Rosie, Riveter, sex symbol

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