Notice that the esata cable actually has a locking

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Notice that the eSATA cable actually has a locking clip. There's one thing that you need to keep in mind when you're working with external SATA devices, eSATA devices, and that is the fact that the eSATA standard does not provide any provision for supplying these external devices with power.We're kind of used to that because of the way FireWire and USB works with external devices. Because of this, eSATA devices actually require an external power source. Basically you've got to plug them into the wall. eSATAp 4:53-5:59 Although eSATA does not provide power for external devices, there is actually another external SATA standard that does provide power for external devices. It's called eSATAp, the p stands for power.Sometimes we call eSATAp power over eSATA. Now eSATAp combines the functionality of an eSATA connector with the functionality of a USB port, and kind of merges them together into a single connector. Because of this, you can actually plug an eSATA device or a USB device into an eSATAp port. An eSATAp port combines the four pins that are used by USB 2.0 with the seven pins that used by an eSATA port. Then it also adds two additional pins that supply power at five and 12 volts. By doing this we allow both SATA data as well as device power to be carried in a single cable. So with that in mind let's spend a few minutes now reviewing the process for selecting and implementing a SATA device. Implementing a SATA Device 6:00-7:16 Before you actually implement a SATA device in your computer system, before you go out and start buying things, you need to check and see what standards are involved. What we want to make sure that we match up the different components appropriately. For example, you need to look at the interface used by the storage device, maybe a hard disk drive, and then look at the interface that's installed in the system, perhaps an integrated SATA controller on the motherboard. Here's the thing you need to remember. If you have a SATA hard disk drive that, say, uses a three gigabit per second SATA standard, then you need to connect it to an interface that can transfer data at at least three gigabits per second. What will happen if you mismatch components? Is all lost, no it's not, it'll still work, but the speed of the connection is going to be reduced to the speed of the slowest component. For example, let's suppose you connect an older SATA I storage device, an old hard drive, to a SATA3 interface on the motherboard. What's going to happen, will it work? Yeah, it'll still work. The motherboard will be able to see the hard drive and be able to write data to it, but the data transfer rate is going to be limited to the speed of the slowest device. In this case, it's the hard disk drive so you're only going to get 1.5 gigabits per second.
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  • Spring '14
  • Serial ATA

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