2 this blog post will include an analysis in an

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#2- This blog post will include an analysis in an archetypal point of view from pages 110-220. At this point in the book, the archetypal figure of The Villain is concluded to be Alphonse. After Jules returns from the hospital, their way of living does not pick up where it was left off. Jules becomes aggressive, often getting angry with Baby on several occasions and not being the loving father he once was. Baby eventually runs away and meets Alphonse. The pimp Baby has grown closer to and craves attention from. Baby has somewhat of a crush on Alphonse, even though he has influenced her into taking drugs and familiarizing herself with alcohol, similarly following the same path as her father. It is clear that Alphonse really does not care for Baby, and is just wanting to exploit her, making him the archetypal villain of this novel. There are several different uncommon archetypal symbols recognized in this book. One of these includes a dirty old doll Baby owns. It is quite evident that Baby has lost her childhood. She holds onto this doll as it reminds her that she had a mother. That she was loved. This doll also represents so much more than what it gives off. Most children have hundreds and hundreds of toys and dolls they play with, and eventually toss away, but Baby does not toss away this doll. She cherishes it. A reason being her cherishment of this old ratty doll, is perhaps that it reminds her that she is also still a kid. It is probable that Baby may lose sight that she really is simply a child with all these aspects in her life trying to prove she's grown, but we must remember that she is a child. Dolls can be considered the archetypal symbol of play for young and innocent girls, and the fact that Baby is clinging on to this doll, may represent the fact that she is trying to
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cling onto her childhood she never got to experience. In the book, Baby says, “As I walked in, I saw a horrible sight on my floor...That doll had been like a miracle to me. It had reminded me that I had been loved by a mother. Now I was a nothing, a real nobody” (O’Neill 119). The doll symbolizes much more to Baby, and now she feels worthless without it. As if it truly meant something to her. Another archetypal symbol I came across could be Alphonse himself. I find that Baby gets perhaps a little too excited when Alphonse compliments her. Perhaps this could be as a result of Baby not having a motherly figure in her life complimenting her and helping her, so when Alphonse comes in, Baby confides and relies on him to give her what she was always missing. This quotation can be found in the book by Alphonse and Baby. “God you're so pretty' he said. After he said that, his kisses begin to feel good" (O'Neill 209). Before, Baby was not interested in Alphonse kissing her, but when he compliments her, she is suddenly interested and is willing to kiss him. His compliments make a sudden impact on Baby, perhaps due to the fact that Baby never really had anyone else to tell her she was beautiful.
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